Required Prevention Training for Incoming Graduate Students

The information below is about required sexual violence and sexual harassment prevention training for incoming graduate students at UC Berkeley. This information has been updated for students starting their program in Fall 2022 and Spring 2023.

*Content Warning: This page contains information about training requirements for the prevention of sexual violence and sexual harassment. These forms of harm are too common, and we recognize that many people in our community have experienced them. If you have concerns about completing the requirements due to personal history, you may request to complete the training requirements in an alternative way by contacting a Confidential Advocate at the PATH to Care Center. You will not be required to disclose any details of your experience. We ask this request to be reserved for students impacted by sexual violence and sexual harassment and/or histories of trauma, violence, or harassment. You can reach an Advocate by email (ptcadvocates@berkeley.edu) or by phone (510-642-1988). Please use the subject line: Alternative to Required Education.

At Berkeley, we are committed to building a community that is safe and affirming for everyone. Each of us plays a vital part in supporting a campus environment where sexual violence and sexual harassment (SVSH), including behaviors such as gender harassment, retaliation, relationship violence, and stalking, have no place.

Below, we outline resources, tools and two required trainings for all incoming graduate students that can help you prevent and respond effectively to instances of sexual violence and harassment.

We recognize that graduate students have unique roles on and off campus. You are role models for many students, mentors and teachers of undergraduates. You depend on productive relationships with faculty who are your advisors or supervisors and are future professionals in training. 

These unique roles place you in a pivotal position to promote a culture of respect, inclusion, and prevention. Graduate students, along with the entire campus community, share a responsibility for creating the culture we all want and deserve. A goal of the required training is to reinforce standards of care and respect, and to foster healthy interactions and relationships both personally and professionally.

Graduate students who are employed by the university have another crucial role: the Responsible Employee obligation under Title IX. University of California policy defines all University employees as Responsible Employees unless they are designated as Confidential Resources. This means that, generally, if you are employed by UC, you must notify the Title IX office when you learn — while you are working — about an incident or behavior that might fall under UC Berkeley’s definitions of sexual violence or sexual harassment that involves a student. If you are unsure of your role or reporting obligations in general, or in a specific matter, please refer to the Responsible Employees FAQ or contact the Office for the Prevention of Harassment and Discrimination (the Title IX office) for a consultation.

Required Trainings

Prevention education training is required for incoming students to ensure that new students are aware of our community expectations of respect, as well as your rights and resources.

Please be sure that you understand your responsibility to complete two forms of training:

  1. Online training module*: We have partnered with EVERFI to provide an online prevention program called “Sexual Assault Prevention for Graduate Students,” available on July 21. You may access the training via your CalCentral Dashboard using your CalNet credentials.
  2. Live prevention education webinar*: All incoming students (except those in online-only programs) must participate in a live Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment Prevention Training, “Cultivating a Respectful Graduate Community,” facilitated by your department and partners in the PATH to Care Center.

Note: Some academic departments will be hosting webinars as part of their program orientation for their students. Please inquire with your graduate advisor if you have not received this information.  

University and Campus Resources

In all of your roles, we want you to feel informed about these issues and empowered to utilize campus resources to gain knowledge and tools that can help you prevent and respond effectively to instances of sexual violence and harassment.

  • Required Training: As stated, all UC campuses provide prevention education to graduate and professional students (as well as to undergraduates, staff, and faculty) and you are required to complete certain elements; see required trainings. 
  • Key information about support services and reporting options, and your responsibilities as a part of the community
  • Confidential advocacy for students is available through the PATH to Care Center and the Social Services unit at the Tang Center. Students may also utilize the Ombuds Office for a confidential place to discuss complaints and consider their options. 
  • The UC Policy on Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment prohibits sexual violence and sexual harassment, including behaviors such as retaliation, relationship violence, and stalking. All UC affiliates, including graduate and professional students, have a right to support services and a grievance process.
  • Students can bring complaints of sexual harassment and sexual violence to a campus administrative office (the Office for the Prevention of Harassment and Discrimination), to law enforcement (UCPD) or a federal agency (the Office for Civil Rights of the Department of Education).

Frequently Asked Questions