Graduate Peer Support Providers 

Graduate Peer Support Providers (PSPs) meet one-on-one with graduate students at UC Berkeley to provide assistance in navigating the complex processes related to mental health, basic needs, and academia. The graduate student experience is challenging and finding services and support can be an additional burden. As graduate students themselves*, PSP’s provide support to their peers through understanding, experience, respect, and an equity based lens. They will work to provide guidance and support to meet your unique needs.

Visit the PSP Chat Session scheduling page to sign up. 

Chat Sessions with the Graduate PSPs are 20 minutes in length. Please read the description box in the appointment confirmation carefully. This is where you will indicate whether you would like to meet in person or via zoom. 

Please note that any appointments made after 5 p.m. the day before your appointment will not be honored because of staffing restrictions due to COVID.

What Graduate Peer Support Providers can do:

  • Talk through and provide a listening ear for concerns related to academia, mental health, wellness, basic needs, socialization, etc.
  • Support students with tedious processes such as scheduling appointments, finding health care providers, accessing academic forms, searching for housing, etc.
  • Share information about mental health services at UC Berkeley by providing access and guidance through resources or in the moment navigation.
  • Provide encouragement and empowerment to students as they navigate graduate school.

What Graduate Peer Support Providers are not equipped to do:

If you are unsure if a Graduate PSP can support your unique concern, please sign up for a chat and we will do our best to point you in the right direction!

*PSPs are supervised by faculty in the School Psychology Program, in collaboration with CAPS.

Want to get connected to PSPs resources? Join our listserv to receive regular updates and special resource spotlights (make sure and click “Join group!)

Peer Support Providers Bios

Elaine Luo

Elaine (Hua) Luo (she/her/hers) is a third-year PhD student in the School Psychology program at the UC Berkeley School of Education. In 2018, she completed her undergraduate studies at UC Irvine with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Education Sciences. In 2020, she received her Master’s degree in Human Development and Psychology from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Elaine’s current research interests focus on the impacts of social-ecological factors on the identity development and socio-emotional development of adolescents. In her free time, she likes to spend time with family and friends, play with her Shiba Inu, and watch movies.

Edwin Carlos

Edwin Carlos (he/him/his) is a third year PhD student in the school psychology program at the Berkeley School of Education. In 2020, he completed his undergraduate studies at Stanford University in psychology and education. His graduate research interests include ethnic-racial identity attitudes, Filipino American mental health outcomes, and Asian American identity development. In his freetime, he likes to play video games, cook new foods, watch basketball, and play tennis.

Xueqin Lin

Xueqin Lin (she/her/hers) is a third year PhD student in the School Psychology program at Berkeley School of Education. She received her Master’s degree in Counseling and Human Services from Lehigh University in 2018. Before her PhD study, she was a mental health clinician working with low-income children and families in the Bay Area. Her graduate research interests focus on understanding contextual factors that affect educators’ psychological well-being, and family-school partnership. In her free time, she likes to sing C-pop songs, spend time with family and friends, and try new things.  

Sarah Manchanda

Sarah Manchanda (she/her/hers)  is a doctoral student in the School Psychology program at the UC Berkeley School of Education. Sarah’s research, professional, and personal interests center on a broad goal of increasing access to inclusive and healthy academic spaces for individuals with disabilities. She studies the bullying and related mental health experiences of youth with disabilities, and is passionate about finding interventions to support positive psychosocial outcomes for youth with disabilities. Professionally, Sarah has five years of experience as a special education teacher in India and the United States, and she is currently working with the GSI Teaching and Resource Center to support GSIs across campus in making sense of and implementing Universal Design for Learning. In her free time, Sarah loves connecting with friends and family, doing yoga, swimming and spending time at the beach, experimenting with new recipes, and drawing.

Julissa Navas

Julissa Navas – Julissa is a third year PhD student in the School Psychology program at UC Berkeley. In 2019, she completed her undergraduate studies at UC Irvine and graduated with a B.A. in Psychology and Education Sciences. Her graduate research currently focuses on examining the relationship between teacher expectations, teacher practices, and students’ academic achievement. In her free time, she likes to draw, play video games, go hiking, and try new food spots with friends.