GPS Resources

Advanced Knowledge

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

BIDS Video Archive 

The Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS) provides a collection of recorded lectures that cover a wide range of topics, tools, programming languages, and methods of analysis of interest to budding graduate student data scientists.

Provided by: Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS)  

Empirical Research Methods Workshops 

In 2007 the Center for the Study of Law and Society (CSLS) launched the CSLS Empirical Research Methods Workshop series. The series introduces Berkeley Law faculty, CSLS affiliated faculty & visiting scholars, and graduate students interested in conducting empirical research on law to a wide range of empirical methods, both quantitative and qualitative. Workshops are led by leading experts on particular methodologies. All workshops are recorded and posted on the CSLS website, along with any necessary workshop materials.

Past topics include:

  • Criminal Justice Data Analysis
  • Using Video Records to Analyze Interactions
  • Ethnography of the Global
  • Survey Research in an Era of Diversity, Polarization, and Technological Change
  • Connecting Qualitative and Quantitative Methods
  • Social Network Analysis in Sociolegal Research
Provided by: Center for the Study of Law and Society  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Communication

Conference Travel Grants 

Academic master’s and all doctoral students may apply for Conference Travel Grant funding to attend professional conferences or to participate in professional development activities; however, students in professional degrees and self-sustaining programs are not eligible. For professional conferences, grant amounts will depend on the location of the conference (up to $600 within California, $900 elsewhere in North America, including Canada and Mexico, and $1,500 outside of North America). The amounts provided for professional development support will vary depending on the actual costs, but in no case will a grant exceed $1,500. Master’s students are eligible for only one travel grant per academic career. Doctoral students are eligible for two grants per academic career, regardless of how many degrees they earn. To be eligible to apply, applicants must:

  1. Be registered for the term in which they are planning to attend the conference, which also includes payment of fees/tuitions. Note: students on filing fee are not eligible.
  2. Be in good academic standing.
  3. Be presenting a paper or poster at the conference.

Please note that grant requests to support travel to professional conferences must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor; grant requests to support professional development activities may be approved by the student’s faculty advisor or the Associate Dean for the Graduate Division. Approvals are obtained through the Slate application portal.

Provided by: Graduate Fellowships Office  

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

GSPDP 320: Academic Writing for Graduate Students 

This course provides graduate students with formal instruction in the genres and mechanics of academic writing at the graduate and professorial level. Through presentations, readings, discussion, and weekly peer editing, graduate students will develop writing and editing skills necessary for their success as graduate students and future faculty.

Course Goals

  • to familiarize graduate students with the different genres of academic writing (e.g., seminar papers, journal articles, books, grant proposals, dissertation prospecti, etc.) and how these genres vary from discipline to discipline;
  • to help graduate students become better writers by analyzing writing on both the micro (sentence) and macro (organizational) levels;
  • to teach graduate students basic skills of professional editing so that they can become better editors of their own work and that of peers;
  • to enable graduate students to apply these skills to a piece of their own writing and to the writing of peers.
Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Graduate Assembly Travel Award 

The Graduate Assembly recognizes that a graduate student’s education requires presenting at conferences and/or seminars, some of which take place in locations outside the Bay Area. Since these conference locations are out of the area, some departments may not provide full financial assistance. As a result, the GA implemented the Travel Award to assist with travel expenses associated with presenting at conferences.

The Travel Award provides funding to graduate students presenting at conferences taking place outside of the San Francisco Bay Area. These conferences must benefit the student’s educational or research endeavors. To be eligible for the Travel Award, the student must be presenting at the conference. The application includes a section to be completed by the student’s Academic Advisor or program advisor, stating their support of the applicant’s attendance at the conference.

Read about the travel award.

Funding support for GA Travel Awards is provided as part of the Peet’s Coffee for a Cause Program. A portion of every Peet’s Coffee purchase made at Cal Dining Peet’s locations helps support student programs and initiatives including graduate travel grants, student scholarships, campus sustainability programs, a basic needs skills course, and an on-campus farm and gardening program. Visit the Peet’s partner page to learn more.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Research

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Teaching

GSI Teaching Gallery 

This video series showcases examples of several common GSI activities. Some frequent kinds of classroom interactions can be difficult to visualize for instructors unfamiliar with running a section or lab but these four highly effective Berkeley GSIs generously allowed us to record a class period. Most of the videos are from one to three minutes long.

Visit the GSI Teaching Gallery.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Teaching Guide for GSIs 

The Teaching Guide is meant to give UC Berkeley GSIs well informed guidance as they begin teaching and throughout their GSI appointments as they continue to hone their skills. Most of the material was researched and developed by current and former GSIs at Berkeley, so it’s contextualized to our teaching situations, our students, and the resources the campus makes available to us.

Visit the Teaching Guide for GSIs.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

How Students Learn: Talks by UC Berkeley Faculty Researchers 

Structuring class activities and assignments that best help students learn is a difficult art to master, so GSIs do well to become informed about the practices that are most effective for student learning and what makes them effective.

On the GSI Center website, you will find links to a variety of resources that explain research on learning, which GSIs can reflect on and apply to their teaching.

Visit the How Students Learn section of the GSI Center website for more information.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

GSI Professional Standards and Ethics Online Course 

Through this course GSIs learn about policies, practices, and standards that all instructors need to know in order to perform their responsibilities professionally and ethically. The course is structured in five modules:

  • Promoting Learning through Diversity: The Inclusive Classroom
  • Teaching Students with Disabilities
  • Creating an Educational Environment Free of Sexual Harassment
  • Fostering Academic Integrity
  • GSI Responsibilities and Ethics

The goal of this online course is to enable GSIs to carry out their responsibilities in a manner that promotes student learning and their own growth as instructors while upholding the professional standards and expectations of the University. Along with the seminar on teaching and learning in higher education that GSIs take in their departments, the Teaching Conference, and the mentoring GSIs receive from the faculty member whom they teach with, this online course  provides GSIs with an excellent foundation as they begin to teach at Berkeley.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Workshops on Teaching for GSIs 

Offered each semester, the GSI Center’s Workshops on Teaching for GSIs cover a wide variety of topics related to university teaching and the GSI experience in 80 minutes. The purpose of the series is to offer GSIs, and other graduate students interested in teaching, opportunities for hands-on learning and practical discussion about pedagogy.

Notes and handouts from selected workshops are available online.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 

As a national leader in preparing graduate students for teaching, UC Berkeley is one of the few universities in the country that have a comprehensive policy on GSI mentoring. The development activities that Berkeley GSIs undertake to fulfill the requirements of this policy—the Teaching Conference, the Online Ethics Course, and the 300-level pedagogy course in their disciplines—support GSIs in their teaching at UC Berkeley, but they also help form the foundation of their teaching and leadership skills in future academic and non-academic careers. The UC Berkeley Certificate Program in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education adds to these three basic requirements participation in workshops on teaching, teaching observation, creation of a teaching portfolio, and several other development activities.

For details, please see the Certificate Program Requirements.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Award-Winning GSI Teaching Ideas 

Over 200 essays written by recipients of the Teaching Effectiveness Award (TEA), a very competitive award given each year by the Graduate Council’s Faculty Advisory Committee for GSI Affairs. Each essay identifies a problem the GSI encountered in teaching, explains the GSI’s strategy and rationale in devising a solution, and assesses the effectiveness of the solution.

Visit the Teaching Effectiveness Award section of the GSI Center website.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Professionalism

Humanists@Work 

Humanists@Work is a UC-wide initiative geared towards UC Humanities and humanistic Social Science MAs and PhDs interested in careers outside/alongside the academy.

Humanists@Work is a targeted continuation of the Mellon-funded Humanities and Changing Conceptions of Work. This initiative, which sought to examine the changing conceptions and experiences of work in the face of major economic, technological and social developments, supported multi-campus research projects, individual scholars, and a daylong workshop geared to humanities graduate students. It was out of this workshop that Humanists@Work was born.

In partnership with the Modern Language Association’s “Connected Academics: Preparing Doctoral Students of Language and Literature for a Variety of Careers” project, UCHRI’s Humanists@Work project will conduct six workshops over the next three years and work closely with language and literature departments across the University of California system to ensure that their graduate students will attend and benefit from the training and engagement and that departments will take the lead in tracking the career prospects and job placements of their respective graduates. In addition to the statewide workshops, UCHRI will create a graduate student advisory committee to assist in planning the workshops and creating content for the website.


MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


CHEM295: Special Topics in Career Development 

A pilot course offered in the College of Chemistry open to all graduate students.

 

This course navigates all aspects of the path to career from the beginning stages of the Individual Development Plan (IDP) in grad school to negotiating your starting salary.


Ph.D. Career Counseling 

The Career Center offers the opportunity to meet with a Ph.D. counselor to discuss the academic job search and the widening range of career options for Ph.D.s. If you have any questions about the academic job search process or are unsure about what other possibilities you’d like to explore, feel free to make an appointment with one of the Career Center’s Ph.D. counselors:

Andrew Green (Ph.D., Political Science, UC Berkeley ’93) taught for six years at Connecticut College before joining the staff of the Career Center on April Fool’s Day, 1997.

Debra Behrens (Ph.D., Education, UC Santa Barbara) taught at California State University before joining the Career Center.

Provided by: Career Center  

Job Search Services 

The Career Center offers a variety of job search services, including CareerMail, a letter of recommendation compiling service, a database of job listings and on-campus recruiting events, and a resume book.

If you want to receive timely updates and information about opportunities and events designed specifically for graduate students and Ph.D.s, sign up for CareerMail. To do so, register or login to Callisto and on your profile select one of the two Ph.D. specific options (Ph.D.s in the Sciences/Eng or Ph.D.s in Hum/Soc Sci). You may also sign up for one or more of the industry-oriented lists (e.g., business, Environmental, or Sciences Biological & Physical).

Letter Service compiles and sends out letters of recommendation files.

Callisto provides online listings of part-time, full-time and temporary jobs exclusively for Cal undergraduate and graduate students. Upon graduation, Ph.D.s can maintain access by purchasing an Alumni Advantage membership. Over 500 employers annually conduct 15,000 interviews on-campus for full-time and summer positions through this web-based recruiting system. Graduate students and Ph.D. Alumni members are eligible and there is no longer a recruiting fee for this service.

Resume books are a job search tool that enables you to circulate your resume to potential employers. By including your resume in one or more of 14 books, you are allowing interested employers to view your resume and contact you directly about job openings and their recruitment activities.

Provided by: Career Center  

Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty 

Offered jointly by the Graduate Writing Center (formerly Academic Services) and the GSI Teaching & Resource Center, the aim of the Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty is to enable graduate students to excel in all aspects of academic life as they pursue an advanced degree at Berkeley and transition from graduate school to future academic careers. The Institute takes place at the end of the Spring semester. Graduate students who are nearing completion of their graduate programs and beginning to prepare for the academic job market are encouraged to apply. For more information or if you have questions about the Summer Institute, please see the Graduate Division’s GSI Teaching and Resource Center website, email gsi@berkeley.edu, or call (510) 642-4456.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center   Graduate Writing Center  

Individual Development Plan (IDP) 

At UC Berkeley the Individual Development Plan (IDP) is defined as a private, dynamic, annual self-evaluation and career exploration tool for graduate students and postdocs. It is a written list of goals mapped to a timeline and includes goal setting for research projects, skills development, and career planning.

The IDP is to be written and developed by the trainee, and can serve as a framework for discussion between faculty mentor and trainee. The IDP is most meaningful if trainees (with support from their mentors) make full use of the IDP’s potential as a research agenda and career development tool, and update it annually to reflect accomplishments and changes in career and research objectives.

Learn more about Individual Development Planning.

Provided by: Visiting Scholar and Postdoc Affairs (VSPA) Program   Career Center  

Leadership

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) 

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) is a collaborative partnership between the Office of Graduate Diversity and the Graduate Assembly (GA). Its goal is to prepare undergraduate UC Berkeley students to select, apply to, and enroll in graduate school. By working with key staff and graduate student mentors, motivated undergraduates are inspired to pursue academic careers as they acquire a better understanding of how to succeed in the graduate school application process.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly   Office for Graduate Diversity  

MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


Graduate Assembly Delegates and Projects 

At UC Berkeley, every student has the power to actively engage with and change the world around them. Don’t just passively experience change in our world – help make change!

Become a Delegate and join students from across campus once a month to discuss campus and graduate student matters, direct your student leadership to action, and vote on important campus issues. Delegates represent their department or graduate student groups as voting member of the Graduate Assembly governing body and sit on influential campus-wide committees. If you are interested in joining the Delegate Assembly, contact the Internal Vice President at internal@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Delegates page.

The GA’s nine sponsored Projects are responsible for creating graduate-centered programming for a wide variety of campus communities. GA Project Directors and their volunteers host conferences, social and networking events, roundtables, and other events by and for graduate students. To get involved with a Project, email the Campus Affairs Vice President at cavp@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Projects page.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) 

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) is a program offered by the GSI Teaching & Resource Center and the Graduate Writing Center that enables doctoral students to create mentored research opportunities for undergraduate students at UC Berkeley. The program provides summer funding for both graduate and undergraduate participants and opportunities to share research results on campus and at national conferences.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center   GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

The Berkeley Graduate 

The Berkeley Graduate, the Graduate Assembly-sponsored publication, is always looking for guest columnists. They welcome columns from Berkeley graduate and professional students on a wide variety of topics related to student life, research, and involvement in the wider community. Columns may range from how to survive and thrive as a graduate or professional student to the latest research in your department. They especially encourage topics that document or facilitate interaction and understanding across departments.

The goal of The Berkeley Graduate is to inform and inspire graduate students by connecting them to a campus-wide community online. By tapping into the collective knowledge of this body of students, they hope students learn from each other how to make the most of their time as Berkeley students; to highlight exciting, interdisciplinary, or collaborative research at Berkeley; and to encourage participation in the broader community through outreach and volunteer work.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Berkeley Connect 

Undergraduates at Berkeley increasingly wish for a more intimate and supportive academic experience, one in which they can be part of an intellectual community comprising faculty, graduate students, their fellow undergraduates, and alumni/ae. Berkeley Connect provides just such an experience by placing participants in small discussion groups assigned to a graduate mentor, who is responsible for group meetings and one-on-one advising. In addition, the program includes informal lectures by professors, visits to Berkeley resources, panel discussions of career opportunities and graduate school, and social events in which professors, graduate students, and undergraduates can talk informally about intellectual issues.

Provided by: Berkeley Connect  

Advanced Knowledge

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

BIDS Video Archive 

The Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS) provides a collection of recorded lectures that cover a wide range of topics, tools, programming languages, and methods of analysis of interest to budding graduate student data scientists.

Provided by: Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS)  

Empirical Research Methods Workshops 

In 2007 the Center for the Study of Law and Society (CSLS) launched the CSLS Empirical Research Methods Workshop series. The series introduces Berkeley Law faculty, CSLS affiliated faculty & visiting scholars, and graduate students interested in conducting empirical research on law to a wide range of empirical methods, both quantitative and qualitative. Workshops are led by leading experts on particular methodologies. All workshops are recorded and posted on the CSLS website, along with any necessary workshop materials.

Past topics include:

  • Criminal Justice Data Analysis
  • Using Video Records to Analyze Interactions
  • Ethnography of the Global
  • Survey Research in an Era of Diversity, Polarization, and Technological Change
  • Connecting Qualitative and Quantitative Methods
  • Social Network Analysis in Sociolegal Research
Provided by: Center for the Study of Law and Society  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Communication

Conference Travel Grants 

Academic master’s and all doctoral students may apply for Conference Travel Grant funding to attend professional conferences or to participate in professional development activities; however, students in professional degrees and self-sustaining programs are not eligible. For professional conferences, grant amounts will depend on the location of the conference (up to $600 within California, $900 elsewhere in North America, including Canada and Mexico, and $1,500 outside of North America). The amounts provided for professional development support will vary depending on the actual costs, but in no case will a grant exceed $1,500. Master’s students are eligible for only one travel grant per academic career. Doctoral students are eligible for two grants per academic career, regardless of how many degrees they earn. To be eligible to apply, applicants must:

  1. Be registered for the term in which they are planning to attend the conference, which also includes payment of fees/tuitions. Note: students on filing fee are not eligible.
  2. Be in good academic standing.
  3. Be presenting a paper or poster at the conference.

Please note that grant requests to support travel to professional conferences must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor; grant requests to support professional development activities may be approved by the student’s faculty advisor or the Associate Dean for the Graduate Division. Approvals are obtained through the Slate application portal.

Provided by: Graduate Fellowships Office  

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

GSPDP 320: Academic Writing for Graduate Students 

This course provides graduate students with formal instruction in the genres and mechanics of academic writing at the graduate and professorial level. Through presentations, readings, discussion, and weekly peer editing, graduate students will develop writing and editing skills necessary for their success as graduate students and future faculty.

Course Goals

  • to familiarize graduate students with the different genres of academic writing (e.g., seminar papers, journal articles, books, grant proposals, dissertation prospecti, etc.) and how these genres vary from discipline to discipline;
  • to help graduate students become better writers by analyzing writing on both the micro (sentence) and macro (organizational) levels;
  • to teach graduate students basic skills of professional editing so that they can become better editors of their own work and that of peers;
  • to enable graduate students to apply these skills to a piece of their own writing and to the writing of peers.
Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Graduate Assembly Travel Award 

The Graduate Assembly recognizes that a graduate student’s education requires presenting at conferences and/or seminars, some of which take place in locations outside the Bay Area. Since these conference locations are out of the area, some departments may not provide full financial assistance. As a result, the GA implemented the Travel Award to assist with travel expenses associated with presenting at conferences.

The Travel Award provides funding to graduate students presenting at conferences taking place outside of the San Francisco Bay Area. These conferences must benefit the student’s educational or research endeavors. To be eligible for the Travel Award, the student must be presenting at the conference. The application includes a section to be completed by the student’s Academic Advisor or program advisor, stating their support of the applicant’s attendance at the conference.

Read about the travel award.

Funding support for GA Travel Awards is provided as part of the Peet’s Coffee for a Cause Program. A portion of every Peet’s Coffee purchase made at Cal Dining Peet’s locations helps support student programs and initiatives including graduate travel grants, student scholarships, campus sustainability programs, a basic needs skills course, and an on-campus farm and gardening program. Visit the Peet’s partner page to learn more.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Research

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Teaching

GSI Teaching Gallery 

This video series showcases examples of several common GSI activities. Some frequent kinds of classroom interactions can be difficult to visualize for instructors unfamiliar with running a section or lab but these four highly effective Berkeley GSIs generously allowed us to record a class period. Most of the videos are from one to three minutes long.

Visit the GSI Teaching Gallery.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Teaching Guide for GSIs 

The Teaching Guide is meant to give UC Berkeley GSIs well informed guidance as they begin teaching and throughout their GSI appointments as they continue to hone their skills. Most of the material was researched and developed by current and former GSIs at Berkeley, so it’s contextualized to our teaching situations, our students, and the resources the campus makes available to us.

Visit the Teaching Guide for GSIs.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

How Students Learn: Talks by UC Berkeley Faculty Researchers 

Structuring class activities and assignments that best help students learn is a difficult art to master, so GSIs do well to become informed about the practices that are most effective for student learning and what makes them effective.

On the GSI Center website, you will find links to a variety of resources that explain research on learning, which GSIs can reflect on and apply to their teaching.

Visit the How Students Learn section of the GSI Center website for more information.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

GSI Professional Standards and Ethics Online Course 

Through this course GSIs learn about policies, practices, and standards that all instructors need to know in order to perform their responsibilities professionally and ethically. The course is structured in five modules:

  • Promoting Learning through Diversity: The Inclusive Classroom
  • Teaching Students with Disabilities
  • Creating an Educational Environment Free of Sexual Harassment
  • Fostering Academic Integrity
  • GSI Responsibilities and Ethics

The goal of this online course is to enable GSIs to carry out their responsibilities in a manner that promotes student learning and their own growth as instructors while upholding the professional standards and expectations of the University. Along with the seminar on teaching and learning in higher education that GSIs take in their departments, the Teaching Conference, and the mentoring GSIs receive from the faculty member whom they teach with, this online course  provides GSIs with an excellent foundation as they begin to teach at Berkeley.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Workshops on Teaching for GSIs 

Offered each semester, the GSI Center’s Workshops on Teaching for GSIs cover a wide variety of topics related to university teaching and the GSI experience in 80 minutes. The purpose of the series is to offer GSIs, and other graduate students interested in teaching, opportunities for hands-on learning and practical discussion about pedagogy.

Notes and handouts from selected workshops are available online.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 

As a national leader in preparing graduate students for teaching, UC Berkeley is one of the few universities in the country that have a comprehensive policy on GSI mentoring. The development activities that Berkeley GSIs undertake to fulfill the requirements of this policy—the Teaching Conference, the Online Ethics Course, and the 300-level pedagogy course in their disciplines—support GSIs in their teaching at UC Berkeley, but they also help form the foundation of their teaching and leadership skills in future academic and non-academic careers. The UC Berkeley Certificate Program in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education adds to these three basic requirements participation in workshops on teaching, teaching observation, creation of a teaching portfolio, and several other development activities.

For details, please see the Certificate Program Requirements.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Award-Winning GSI Teaching Ideas 

Over 200 essays written by recipients of the Teaching Effectiveness Award (TEA), a very competitive award given each year by the Graduate Council’s Faculty Advisory Committee for GSI Affairs. Each essay identifies a problem the GSI encountered in teaching, explains the GSI’s strategy and rationale in devising a solution, and assesses the effectiveness of the solution.

Visit the Teaching Effectiveness Award section of the GSI Center website.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Professionalism

Humanists@Work 

Humanists@Work is a UC-wide initiative geared towards UC Humanities and humanistic Social Science MAs and PhDs interested in careers outside/alongside the academy.

Humanists@Work is a targeted continuation of the Mellon-funded Humanities and Changing Conceptions of Work. This initiative, which sought to examine the changing conceptions and experiences of work in the face of major economic, technological and social developments, supported multi-campus research projects, individual scholars, and a daylong workshop geared to humanities graduate students. It was out of this workshop that Humanists@Work was born.

In partnership with the Modern Language Association’s “Connected Academics: Preparing Doctoral Students of Language and Literature for a Variety of Careers” project, UCHRI’s Humanists@Work project will conduct six workshops over the next three years and work closely with language and literature departments across the University of California system to ensure that their graduate students will attend and benefit from the training and engagement and that departments will take the lead in tracking the career prospects and job placements of their respective graduates. In addition to the statewide workshops, UCHRI will create a graduate student advisory committee to assist in planning the workshops and creating content for the website.


MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


CHEM295: Special Topics in Career Development 

A pilot course offered in the College of Chemistry open to all graduate students.

 

This course navigates all aspects of the path to career from the beginning stages of the Individual Development Plan (IDP) in grad school to negotiating your starting salary.


Ph.D. Career Counseling 

The Career Center offers the opportunity to meet with a Ph.D. counselor to discuss the academic job search and the widening range of career options for Ph.D.s. If you have any questions about the academic job search process or are unsure about what other possibilities you’d like to explore, feel free to make an appointment with one of the Career Center’s Ph.D. counselors:

Andrew Green (Ph.D., Political Science, UC Berkeley ’93) taught for six years at Connecticut College before joining the staff of the Career Center on April Fool’s Day, 1997.

Debra Behrens (Ph.D., Education, UC Santa Barbara) taught at California State University before joining the Career Center.

Provided by: Career Center  

Job Search Services 

The Career Center offers a variety of job search services, including CareerMail, a letter of recommendation compiling service, a database of job listings and on-campus recruiting events, and a resume book.

If you want to receive timely updates and information about opportunities and events designed specifically for graduate students and Ph.D.s, sign up for CareerMail. To do so, register or login to Callisto and on your profile select one of the two Ph.D. specific options (Ph.D.s in the Sciences/Eng or Ph.D.s in Hum/Soc Sci). You may also sign up for one or more of the industry-oriented lists (e.g., business, Environmental, or Sciences Biological & Physical).

Letter Service compiles and sends out letters of recommendation files.

Callisto provides online listings of part-time, full-time and temporary jobs exclusively for Cal undergraduate and graduate students. Upon graduation, Ph.D.s can maintain access by purchasing an Alumni Advantage membership. Over 500 employers annually conduct 15,000 interviews on-campus for full-time and summer positions through this web-based recruiting system. Graduate students and Ph.D. Alumni members are eligible and there is no longer a recruiting fee for this service.

Resume books are a job search tool that enables you to circulate your resume to potential employers. By including your resume in one or more of 14 books, you are allowing interested employers to view your resume and contact you directly about job openings and their recruitment activities.

Provided by: Career Center  

Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty 

Offered jointly by the Graduate Writing Center (formerly Academic Services) and the GSI Teaching & Resource Center, the aim of the Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty is to enable graduate students to excel in all aspects of academic life as they pursue an advanced degree at Berkeley and transition from graduate school to future academic careers. The Institute takes place at the end of the Spring semester. Graduate students who are nearing completion of their graduate programs and beginning to prepare for the academic job market are encouraged to apply. For more information or if you have questions about the Summer Institute, please see the Graduate Division’s GSI Teaching and Resource Center website, email gsi@berkeley.edu, or call (510) 642-4456.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center   Graduate Writing Center  

Individual Development Plan (IDP) 

At UC Berkeley the Individual Development Plan (IDP) is defined as a private, dynamic, annual self-evaluation and career exploration tool for graduate students and postdocs. It is a written list of goals mapped to a timeline and includes goal setting for research projects, skills development, and career planning.

The IDP is to be written and developed by the trainee, and can serve as a framework for discussion between faculty mentor and trainee. The IDP is most meaningful if trainees (with support from their mentors) make full use of the IDP’s potential as a research agenda and career development tool, and update it annually to reflect accomplishments and changes in career and research objectives.

Learn more about Individual Development Planning.

Provided by: Visiting Scholar and Postdoc Affairs (VSPA) Program   Career Center  

Leadership

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) 

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) is a collaborative partnership between the Office of Graduate Diversity and the Graduate Assembly (GA). Its goal is to prepare undergraduate UC Berkeley students to select, apply to, and enroll in graduate school. By working with key staff and graduate student mentors, motivated undergraduates are inspired to pursue academic careers as they acquire a better understanding of how to succeed in the graduate school application process.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly   Office for Graduate Diversity  

MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


Graduate Assembly Delegates and Projects 

At UC Berkeley, every student has the power to actively engage with and change the world around them. Don’t just passively experience change in our world – help make change!

Become a Delegate and join students from across campus once a month to discuss campus and graduate student matters, direct your student leadership to action, and vote on important campus issues. Delegates represent their department or graduate student groups as voting member of the Graduate Assembly governing body and sit on influential campus-wide committees. If you are interested in joining the Delegate Assembly, contact the Internal Vice President at internal@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Delegates page.

The GA’s nine sponsored Projects are responsible for creating graduate-centered programming for a wide variety of campus communities. GA Project Directors and their volunteers host conferences, social and networking events, roundtables, and other events by and for graduate students. To get involved with a Project, email the Campus Affairs Vice President at cavp@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Projects page.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) 

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) is a program offered by the GSI Teaching & Resource Center and the Graduate Writing Center that enables doctoral students to create mentored research opportunities for undergraduate students at UC Berkeley. The program provides summer funding for both graduate and undergraduate participants and opportunities to share research results on campus and at national conferences.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center   GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

The Berkeley Graduate 

The Berkeley Graduate, the Graduate Assembly-sponsored publication, is always looking for guest columnists. They welcome columns from Berkeley graduate and professional students on a wide variety of topics related to student life, research, and involvement in the wider community. Columns may range from how to survive and thrive as a graduate or professional student to the latest research in your department. They especially encourage topics that document or facilitate interaction and understanding across departments.

The goal of The Berkeley Graduate is to inform and inspire graduate students by connecting them to a campus-wide community online. By tapping into the collective knowledge of this body of students, they hope students learn from each other how to make the most of their time as Berkeley students; to highlight exciting, interdisciplinary, or collaborative research at Berkeley; and to encourage participation in the broader community through outreach and volunteer work.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Berkeley Connect 

Undergraduates at Berkeley increasingly wish for a more intimate and supportive academic experience, one in which they can be part of an intellectual community comprising faculty, graduate students, their fellow undergraduates, and alumni/ae. Berkeley Connect provides just such an experience by placing participants in small discussion groups assigned to a graduate mentor, who is responsible for group meetings and one-on-one advising. In addition, the program includes informal lectures by professors, visits to Berkeley resources, panel discussions of career opportunities and graduate school, and social events in which professors, graduate students, and undergraduates can talk informally about intellectual issues.

Provided by: Berkeley Connect  

Advanced Knowledge

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

BIDS Video Archive 

The Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS) provides a collection of recorded lectures that cover a wide range of topics, tools, programming languages, and methods of analysis of interest to budding graduate student data scientists.

Provided by: Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS)  

Empirical Research Methods Workshops 

In 2007 the Center for the Study of Law and Society (CSLS) launched the CSLS Empirical Research Methods Workshop series. The series introduces Berkeley Law faculty, CSLS affiliated faculty & visiting scholars, and graduate students interested in conducting empirical research on law to a wide range of empirical methods, both quantitative and qualitative. Workshops are led by leading experts on particular methodologies. All workshops are recorded and posted on the CSLS website, along with any necessary workshop materials.

Past topics include:

  • Criminal Justice Data Analysis
  • Using Video Records to Analyze Interactions
  • Ethnography of the Global
  • Survey Research in an Era of Diversity, Polarization, and Technological Change
  • Connecting Qualitative and Quantitative Methods
  • Social Network Analysis in Sociolegal Research
Provided by: Center for the Study of Law and Society  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Communication

Conference Travel Grants 

Academic master’s and all doctoral students may apply for Conference Travel Grant funding to attend professional conferences or to participate in professional development activities; however, students in professional degrees and self-sustaining programs are not eligible. For professional conferences, grant amounts will depend on the location of the conference (up to $600 within California, $900 elsewhere in North America, including Canada and Mexico, and $1,500 outside of North America). The amounts provided for professional development support will vary depending on the actual costs, but in no case will a grant exceed $1,500. Master’s students are eligible for only one travel grant per academic career. Doctoral students are eligible for two grants per academic career, regardless of how many degrees they earn. To be eligible to apply, applicants must:

  1. Be registered for the term in which they are planning to attend the conference, which also includes payment of fees/tuitions. Note: students on filing fee are not eligible.
  2. Be in good academic standing.
  3. Be presenting a paper or poster at the conference.

Please note that grant requests to support travel to professional conferences must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor; grant requests to support professional development activities may be approved by the student’s faculty advisor or the Associate Dean for the Graduate Division. Approvals are obtained through the Slate application portal.

Provided by: Graduate Fellowships Office  

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

GSPDP 320: Academic Writing for Graduate Students 

This course provides graduate students with formal instruction in the genres and mechanics of academic writing at the graduate and professorial level. Through presentations, readings, discussion, and weekly peer editing, graduate students will develop writing and editing skills necessary for their success as graduate students and future faculty.

Course Goals

  • to familiarize graduate students with the different genres of academic writing (e.g., seminar papers, journal articles, books, grant proposals, dissertation prospecti, etc.) and how these genres vary from discipline to discipline;
  • to help graduate students become better writers by analyzing writing on both the micro (sentence) and macro (organizational) levels;
  • to teach graduate students basic skills of professional editing so that they can become better editors of their own work and that of peers;
  • to enable graduate students to apply these skills to a piece of their own writing and to the writing of peers.
Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Graduate Assembly Travel Award 

The Graduate Assembly recognizes that a graduate student’s education requires presenting at conferences and/or seminars, some of which take place in locations outside the Bay Area. Since these conference locations are out of the area, some departments may not provide full financial assistance. As a result, the GA implemented the Travel Award to assist with travel expenses associated with presenting at conferences.

The Travel Award provides funding to graduate students presenting at conferences taking place outside of the San Francisco Bay Area. These conferences must benefit the student’s educational or research endeavors. To be eligible for the Travel Award, the student must be presenting at the conference. The application includes a section to be completed by the student’s Academic Advisor or program advisor, stating their support of the applicant’s attendance at the conference.

Read about the travel award.

Funding support for GA Travel Awards is provided as part of the Peet’s Coffee for a Cause Program. A portion of every Peet’s Coffee purchase made at Cal Dining Peet’s locations helps support student programs and initiatives including graduate travel grants, student scholarships, campus sustainability programs, a basic needs skills course, and an on-campus farm and gardening program. Visit the Peet’s partner page to learn more.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Research

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Teaching

GSI Teaching Gallery 

This video series showcases examples of several common GSI activities. Some frequent kinds of classroom interactions can be difficult to visualize for instructors unfamiliar with running a section or lab but these four highly effective Berkeley GSIs generously allowed us to record a class period. Most of the videos are from one to three minutes long.

Visit the GSI Teaching Gallery.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Teaching Guide for GSIs 

The Teaching Guide is meant to give UC Berkeley GSIs well informed guidance as they begin teaching and throughout their GSI appointments as they continue to hone their skills. Most of the material was researched and developed by current and former GSIs at Berkeley, so it’s contextualized to our teaching situations, our students, and the resources the campus makes available to us.

Visit the Teaching Guide for GSIs.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

How Students Learn: Talks by UC Berkeley Faculty Researchers 

Structuring class activities and assignments that best help students learn is a difficult art to master, so GSIs do well to become informed about the practices that are most effective for student learning and what makes them effective.

On the GSI Center website, you will find links to a variety of resources that explain research on learning, which GSIs can reflect on and apply to their teaching.

Visit the How Students Learn section of the GSI Center website for more information.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

GSI Professional Standards and Ethics Online Course 

Through this course GSIs learn about policies, practices, and standards that all instructors need to know in order to perform their responsibilities professionally and ethically. The course is structured in five modules:

  • Promoting Learning through Diversity: The Inclusive Classroom
  • Teaching Students with Disabilities
  • Creating an Educational Environment Free of Sexual Harassment
  • Fostering Academic Integrity
  • GSI Responsibilities and Ethics

The goal of this online course is to enable GSIs to carry out their responsibilities in a manner that promotes student learning and their own growth as instructors while upholding the professional standards and expectations of the University. Along with the seminar on teaching and learning in higher education that GSIs take in their departments, the Teaching Conference, and the mentoring GSIs receive from the faculty member whom they teach with, this online course  provides GSIs with an excellent foundation as they begin to teach at Berkeley.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Workshops on Teaching for GSIs 

Offered each semester, the GSI Center’s Workshops on Teaching for GSIs cover a wide variety of topics related to university teaching and the GSI experience in 80 minutes. The purpose of the series is to offer GSIs, and other graduate students interested in teaching, opportunities for hands-on learning and practical discussion about pedagogy.

Notes and handouts from selected workshops are available online.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 

As a national leader in preparing graduate students for teaching, UC Berkeley is one of the few universities in the country that have a comprehensive policy on GSI mentoring. The development activities that Berkeley GSIs undertake to fulfill the requirements of this policy—the Teaching Conference, the Online Ethics Course, and the 300-level pedagogy course in their disciplines—support GSIs in their teaching at UC Berkeley, but they also help form the foundation of their teaching and leadership skills in future academic and non-academic careers. The UC Berkeley Certificate Program in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education adds to these three basic requirements participation in workshops on teaching, teaching observation, creation of a teaching portfolio, and several other development activities.

For details, please see the Certificate Program Requirements.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Award-Winning GSI Teaching Ideas 

Over 200 essays written by recipients of the Teaching Effectiveness Award (TEA), a very competitive award given each year by the Graduate Council’s Faculty Advisory Committee for GSI Affairs. Each essay identifies a problem the GSI encountered in teaching, explains the GSI’s strategy and rationale in devising a solution, and assesses the effectiveness of the solution.

Visit the Teaching Effectiveness Award section of the GSI Center website.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Professionalism

Humanists@Work 

Humanists@Work is a UC-wide initiative geared towards UC Humanities and humanistic Social Science MAs and PhDs interested in careers outside/alongside the academy.

Humanists@Work is a targeted continuation of the Mellon-funded Humanities and Changing Conceptions of Work. This initiative, which sought to examine the changing conceptions and experiences of work in the face of major economic, technological and social developments, supported multi-campus research projects, individual scholars, and a daylong workshop geared to humanities graduate students. It was out of this workshop that Humanists@Work was born.

In partnership with the Modern Language Association’s “Connected Academics: Preparing Doctoral Students of Language and Literature for a Variety of Careers” project, UCHRI’s Humanists@Work project will conduct six workshops over the next three years and work closely with language and literature departments across the University of California system to ensure that their graduate students will attend and benefit from the training and engagement and that departments will take the lead in tracking the career prospects and job placements of their respective graduates. In addition to the statewide workshops, UCHRI will create a graduate student advisory committee to assist in planning the workshops and creating content for the website.


MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


CHEM295: Special Topics in Career Development 

A pilot course offered in the College of Chemistry open to all graduate students.

 

This course navigates all aspects of the path to career from the beginning stages of the Individual Development Plan (IDP) in grad school to negotiating your starting salary.


Ph.D. Career Counseling 

The Career Center offers the opportunity to meet with a Ph.D. counselor to discuss the academic job search and the widening range of career options for Ph.D.s. If you have any questions about the academic job search process or are unsure about what other possibilities you’d like to explore, feel free to make an appointment with one of the Career Center’s Ph.D. counselors:

Andrew Green (Ph.D., Political Science, UC Berkeley ’93) taught for six years at Connecticut College before joining the staff of the Career Center on April Fool’s Day, 1997.

Debra Behrens (Ph.D., Education, UC Santa Barbara) taught at California State University before joining the Career Center.

Provided by: Career Center  

Job Search Services 

The Career Center offers a variety of job search services, including CareerMail, a letter of recommendation compiling service, a database of job listings and on-campus recruiting events, and a resume book.

If you want to receive timely updates and information about opportunities and events designed specifically for graduate students and Ph.D.s, sign up for CareerMail. To do so, register or login to Callisto and on your profile select one of the two Ph.D. specific options (Ph.D.s in the Sciences/Eng or Ph.D.s in Hum/Soc Sci). You may also sign up for one or more of the industry-oriented lists (e.g., business, Environmental, or Sciences Biological & Physical).

Letter Service compiles and sends out letters of recommendation files.

Callisto provides online listings of part-time, full-time and temporary jobs exclusively for Cal undergraduate and graduate students. Upon graduation, Ph.D.s can maintain access by purchasing an Alumni Advantage membership. Over 500 employers annually conduct 15,000 interviews on-campus for full-time and summer positions through this web-based recruiting system. Graduate students and Ph.D. Alumni members are eligible and there is no longer a recruiting fee for this service.

Resume books are a job search tool that enables you to circulate your resume to potential employers. By including your resume in one or more of 14 books, you are allowing interested employers to view your resume and contact you directly about job openings and their recruitment activities.

Provided by: Career Center  

Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty 

Offered jointly by the Graduate Writing Center (formerly Academic Services) and the GSI Teaching & Resource Center, the aim of the Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty is to enable graduate students to excel in all aspects of academic life as they pursue an advanced degree at Berkeley and transition from graduate school to future academic careers. The Institute takes place at the end of the Spring semester. Graduate students who are nearing completion of their graduate programs and beginning to prepare for the academic job market are encouraged to apply. For more information or if you have questions about the Summer Institute, please see the Graduate Division’s GSI Teaching and Resource Center website, email gsi@berkeley.edu, or call (510) 642-4456.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center   Graduate Writing Center  

Individual Development Plan (IDP) 

At UC Berkeley the Individual Development Plan (IDP) is defined as a private, dynamic, annual self-evaluation and career exploration tool for graduate students and postdocs. It is a written list of goals mapped to a timeline and includes goal setting for research projects, skills development, and career planning.

The IDP is to be written and developed by the trainee, and can serve as a framework for discussion between faculty mentor and trainee. The IDP is most meaningful if trainees (with support from their mentors) make full use of the IDP’s potential as a research agenda and career development tool, and update it annually to reflect accomplishments and changes in career and research objectives.

Learn more about Individual Development Planning.

Provided by: Visiting Scholar and Postdoc Affairs (VSPA) Program   Career Center  

Leadership

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) 

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) is a collaborative partnership between the Office of Graduate Diversity and the Graduate Assembly (GA). Its goal is to prepare undergraduate UC Berkeley students to select, apply to, and enroll in graduate school. By working with key staff and graduate student mentors, motivated undergraduates are inspired to pursue academic careers as they acquire a better understanding of how to succeed in the graduate school application process.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly   Office for Graduate Diversity  

MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


Graduate Assembly Delegates and Projects 

At UC Berkeley, every student has the power to actively engage with and change the world around them. Don’t just passively experience change in our world – help make change!

Become a Delegate and join students from across campus once a month to discuss campus and graduate student matters, direct your student leadership to action, and vote on important campus issues. Delegates represent their department or graduate student groups as voting member of the Graduate Assembly governing body and sit on influential campus-wide committees. If you are interested in joining the Delegate Assembly, contact the Internal Vice President at internal@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Delegates page.

The GA’s nine sponsored Projects are responsible for creating graduate-centered programming for a wide variety of campus communities. GA Project Directors and their volunteers host conferences, social and networking events, roundtables, and other events by and for graduate students. To get involved with a Project, email the Campus Affairs Vice President at cavp@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Projects page.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) 

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) is a program offered by the GSI Teaching & Resource Center and the Graduate Writing Center that enables doctoral students to create mentored research opportunities for undergraduate students at UC Berkeley. The program provides summer funding for both graduate and undergraduate participants and opportunities to share research results on campus and at national conferences.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center   GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

The Berkeley Graduate 

The Berkeley Graduate, the Graduate Assembly-sponsored publication, is always looking for guest columnists. They welcome columns from Berkeley graduate and professional students on a wide variety of topics related to student life, research, and involvement in the wider community. Columns may range from how to survive and thrive as a graduate or professional student to the latest research in your department. They especially encourage topics that document or facilitate interaction and understanding across departments.

The goal of The Berkeley Graduate is to inform and inspire graduate students by connecting them to a campus-wide community online. By tapping into the collective knowledge of this body of students, they hope students learn from each other how to make the most of their time as Berkeley students; to highlight exciting, interdisciplinary, or collaborative research at Berkeley; and to encourage participation in the broader community through outreach and volunteer work.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Berkeley Connect 

Undergraduates at Berkeley increasingly wish for a more intimate and supportive academic experience, one in which they can be part of an intellectual community comprising faculty, graduate students, their fellow undergraduates, and alumni/ae. Berkeley Connect provides just such an experience by placing participants in small discussion groups assigned to a graduate mentor, who is responsible for group meetings and one-on-one advising. In addition, the program includes informal lectures by professors, visits to Berkeley resources, panel discussions of career opportunities and graduate school, and social events in which professors, graduate students, and undergraduates can talk informally about intellectual issues.

Provided by: Berkeley Connect  

Advanced Knowledge

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

BIDS Video Archive 

The Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS) provides a collection of recorded lectures that cover a wide range of topics, tools, programming languages, and methods of analysis of interest to budding graduate student data scientists.

Provided by: Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS)  

Empirical Research Methods Workshops 

In 2007 the Center for the Study of Law and Society (CSLS) launched the CSLS Empirical Research Methods Workshop series. The series introduces Berkeley Law faculty, CSLS affiliated faculty & visiting scholars, and graduate students interested in conducting empirical research on law to a wide range of empirical methods, both quantitative and qualitative. Workshops are led by leading experts on particular methodologies. All workshops are recorded and posted on the CSLS website, along with any necessary workshop materials.

Past topics include:

  • Criminal Justice Data Analysis
  • Using Video Records to Analyze Interactions
  • Ethnography of the Global
  • Survey Research in an Era of Diversity, Polarization, and Technological Change
  • Connecting Qualitative and Quantitative Methods
  • Social Network Analysis in Sociolegal Research
Provided by: Center for the Study of Law and Society  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Communication

Conference Travel Grants 

Academic master’s and all doctoral students may apply for Conference Travel Grant funding to attend professional conferences or to participate in professional development activities; however, students in professional degrees and self-sustaining programs are not eligible. For professional conferences, grant amounts will depend on the location of the conference (up to $600 within California, $900 elsewhere in North America, including Canada and Mexico, and $1,500 outside of North America). The amounts provided for professional development support will vary depending on the actual costs, but in no case will a grant exceed $1,500. Master’s students are eligible for only one travel grant per academic career. Doctoral students are eligible for two grants per academic career, regardless of how many degrees they earn. To be eligible to apply, applicants must:

  1. Be registered for the term in which they are planning to attend the conference, which also includes payment of fees/tuitions. Note: students on filing fee are not eligible.
  2. Be in good academic standing.
  3. Be presenting a paper or poster at the conference.

Please note that grant requests to support travel to professional conferences must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor; grant requests to support professional development activities may be approved by the student’s faculty advisor or the Associate Dean for the Graduate Division. Approvals are obtained through the Slate application portal.

Provided by: Graduate Fellowships Office  

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

GSPDP 320: Academic Writing for Graduate Students 

This course provides graduate students with formal instruction in the genres and mechanics of academic writing at the graduate and professorial level. Through presentations, readings, discussion, and weekly peer editing, graduate students will develop writing and editing skills necessary for their success as graduate students and future faculty.

Course Goals

  • to familiarize graduate students with the different genres of academic writing (e.g., seminar papers, journal articles, books, grant proposals, dissertation prospecti, etc.) and how these genres vary from discipline to discipline;
  • to help graduate students become better writers by analyzing writing on both the micro (sentence) and macro (organizational) levels;
  • to teach graduate students basic skills of professional editing so that they can become better editors of their own work and that of peers;
  • to enable graduate students to apply these skills to a piece of their own writing and to the writing of peers.
Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Graduate Assembly Travel Award 

The Graduate Assembly recognizes that a graduate student’s education requires presenting at conferences and/or seminars, some of which take place in locations outside the Bay Area. Since these conference locations are out of the area, some departments may not provide full financial assistance. As a result, the GA implemented the Travel Award to assist with travel expenses associated with presenting at conferences.

The Travel Award provides funding to graduate students presenting at conferences taking place outside of the San Francisco Bay Area. These conferences must benefit the student’s educational or research endeavors. To be eligible for the Travel Award, the student must be presenting at the conference. The application includes a section to be completed by the student’s Academic Advisor or program advisor, stating their support of the applicant’s attendance at the conference.

Read about the travel award.

Funding support for GA Travel Awards is provided as part of the Peet’s Coffee for a Cause Program. A portion of every Peet’s Coffee purchase made at Cal Dining Peet’s locations helps support student programs and initiatives including graduate travel grants, student scholarships, campus sustainability programs, a basic needs skills course, and an on-campus farm and gardening program. Visit the Peet’s partner page to learn more.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Research

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Teaching

GSI Teaching Gallery 

This video series showcases examples of several common GSI activities. Some frequent kinds of classroom interactions can be difficult to visualize for instructors unfamiliar with running a section or lab but these four highly effective Berkeley GSIs generously allowed us to record a class period. Most of the videos are from one to three minutes long.

Visit the GSI Teaching Gallery.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Teaching Guide for GSIs 

The Teaching Guide is meant to give UC Berkeley GSIs well informed guidance as they begin teaching and throughout their GSI appointments as they continue to hone their skills. Most of the material was researched and developed by current and former GSIs at Berkeley, so it’s contextualized to our teaching situations, our students, and the resources the campus makes available to us.

Visit the Teaching Guide for GSIs.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

How Students Learn: Talks by UC Berkeley Faculty Researchers 

Structuring class activities and assignments that best help students learn is a difficult art to master, so GSIs do well to become informed about the practices that are most effective for student learning and what makes them effective.

On the GSI Center website, you will find links to a variety of resources that explain research on learning, which GSIs can reflect on and apply to their teaching.

Visit the How Students Learn section of the GSI Center website for more information.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

GSI Professional Standards and Ethics Online Course 

Through this course GSIs learn about policies, practices, and standards that all instructors need to know in order to perform their responsibilities professionally and ethically. The course is structured in five modules:

  • Promoting Learning through Diversity: The Inclusive Classroom
  • Teaching Students with Disabilities
  • Creating an Educational Environment Free of Sexual Harassment
  • Fostering Academic Integrity
  • GSI Responsibilities and Ethics

The goal of this online course is to enable GSIs to carry out their responsibilities in a manner that promotes student learning and their own growth as instructors while upholding the professional standards and expectations of the University. Along with the seminar on teaching and learning in higher education that GSIs take in their departments, the Teaching Conference, and the mentoring GSIs receive from the faculty member whom they teach with, this online course  provides GSIs with an excellent foundation as they begin to teach at Berkeley.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Workshops on Teaching for GSIs 

Offered each semester, the GSI Center’s Workshops on Teaching for GSIs cover a wide variety of topics related to university teaching and the GSI experience in 80 minutes. The purpose of the series is to offer GSIs, and other graduate students interested in teaching, opportunities for hands-on learning and practical discussion about pedagogy.

Notes and handouts from selected workshops are available online.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 

As a national leader in preparing graduate students for teaching, UC Berkeley is one of the few universities in the country that have a comprehensive policy on GSI mentoring. The development activities that Berkeley GSIs undertake to fulfill the requirements of this policy—the Teaching Conference, the Online Ethics Course, and the 300-level pedagogy course in their disciplines—support GSIs in their teaching at UC Berkeley, but they also help form the foundation of their teaching and leadership skills in future academic and non-academic careers. The UC Berkeley Certificate Program in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education adds to these three basic requirements participation in workshops on teaching, teaching observation, creation of a teaching portfolio, and several other development activities.

For details, please see the Certificate Program Requirements.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Award-Winning GSI Teaching Ideas 

Over 200 essays written by recipients of the Teaching Effectiveness Award (TEA), a very competitive award given each year by the Graduate Council’s Faculty Advisory Committee for GSI Affairs. Each essay identifies a problem the GSI encountered in teaching, explains the GSI’s strategy and rationale in devising a solution, and assesses the effectiveness of the solution.

Visit the Teaching Effectiveness Award section of the GSI Center website.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Professionalism

Humanists@Work 

Humanists@Work is a UC-wide initiative geared towards UC Humanities and humanistic Social Science MAs and PhDs interested in careers outside/alongside the academy.

Humanists@Work is a targeted continuation of the Mellon-funded Humanities and Changing Conceptions of Work. This initiative, which sought to examine the changing conceptions and experiences of work in the face of major economic, technological and social developments, supported multi-campus research projects, individual scholars, and a daylong workshop geared to humanities graduate students. It was out of this workshop that Humanists@Work was born.

In partnership with the Modern Language Association’s “Connected Academics: Preparing Doctoral Students of Language and Literature for a Variety of Careers” project, UCHRI’s Humanists@Work project will conduct six workshops over the next three years and work closely with language and literature departments across the University of California system to ensure that their graduate students will attend and benefit from the training and engagement and that departments will take the lead in tracking the career prospects and job placements of their respective graduates. In addition to the statewide workshops, UCHRI will create a graduate student advisory committee to assist in planning the workshops and creating content for the website.


MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


CHEM295: Special Topics in Career Development 

A pilot course offered in the College of Chemistry open to all graduate students.

 

This course navigates all aspects of the path to career from the beginning stages of the Individual Development Plan (IDP) in grad school to negotiating your starting salary.


Ph.D. Career Counseling 

The Career Center offers the opportunity to meet with a Ph.D. counselor to discuss the academic job search and the widening range of career options for Ph.D.s. If you have any questions about the academic job search process or are unsure about what other possibilities you’d like to explore, feel free to make an appointment with one of the Career Center’s Ph.D. counselors:

Andrew Green (Ph.D., Political Science, UC Berkeley ’93) taught for six years at Connecticut College before joining the staff of the Career Center on April Fool’s Day, 1997.

Debra Behrens (Ph.D., Education, UC Santa Barbara) taught at California State University before joining the Career Center.

Provided by: Career Center  

Job Search Services 

The Career Center offers a variety of job search services, including CareerMail, a letter of recommendation compiling service, a database of job listings and on-campus recruiting events, and a resume book.

If you want to receive timely updates and information about opportunities and events designed specifically for graduate students and Ph.D.s, sign up for CareerMail. To do so, register or login to Callisto and on your profile select one of the two Ph.D. specific options (Ph.D.s in the Sciences/Eng or Ph.D.s in Hum/Soc Sci). You may also sign up for one or more of the industry-oriented lists (e.g., business, Environmental, or Sciences Biological & Physical).

Letter Service compiles and sends out letters of recommendation files.

Callisto provides online listings of part-time, full-time and temporary jobs exclusively for Cal undergraduate and graduate students. Upon graduation, Ph.D.s can maintain access by purchasing an Alumni Advantage membership. Over 500 employers annually conduct 15,000 interviews on-campus for full-time and summer positions through this web-based recruiting system. Graduate students and Ph.D. Alumni members are eligible and there is no longer a recruiting fee for this service.

Resume books are a job search tool that enables you to circulate your resume to potential employers. By including your resume in one or more of 14 books, you are allowing interested employers to view your resume and contact you directly about job openings and their recruitment activities.

Provided by: Career Center  

Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty 

Offered jointly by the Graduate Writing Center (formerly Academic Services) and the GSI Teaching & Resource Center, the aim of the Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty is to enable graduate students to excel in all aspects of academic life as they pursue an advanced degree at Berkeley and transition from graduate school to future academic careers. The Institute takes place at the end of the Spring semester. Graduate students who are nearing completion of their graduate programs and beginning to prepare for the academic job market are encouraged to apply. For more information or if you have questions about the Summer Institute, please see the Graduate Division’s GSI Teaching and Resource Center website, email gsi@berkeley.edu, or call (510) 642-4456.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center   Graduate Writing Center  

Individual Development Plan (IDP) 

At UC Berkeley the Individual Development Plan (IDP) is defined as a private, dynamic, annual self-evaluation and career exploration tool for graduate students and postdocs. It is a written list of goals mapped to a timeline and includes goal setting for research projects, skills development, and career planning.

The IDP is to be written and developed by the trainee, and can serve as a framework for discussion between faculty mentor and trainee. The IDP is most meaningful if trainees (with support from their mentors) make full use of the IDP’s potential as a research agenda and career development tool, and update it annually to reflect accomplishments and changes in career and research objectives.

Learn more about Individual Development Planning.

Provided by: Visiting Scholar and Postdoc Affairs (VSPA) Program   Career Center  

Leadership

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) 

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) is a collaborative partnership between the Office of Graduate Diversity and the Graduate Assembly (GA). Its goal is to prepare undergraduate UC Berkeley students to select, apply to, and enroll in graduate school. By working with key staff and graduate student mentors, motivated undergraduates are inspired to pursue academic careers as they acquire a better understanding of how to succeed in the graduate school application process.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly   Office for Graduate Diversity  

MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


Graduate Assembly Delegates and Projects 

At UC Berkeley, every student has the power to actively engage with and change the world around them. Don’t just passively experience change in our world – help make change!

Become a Delegate and join students from across campus once a month to discuss campus and graduate student matters, direct your student leadership to action, and vote on important campus issues. Delegates represent their department or graduate student groups as voting member of the Graduate Assembly governing body and sit on influential campus-wide committees. If you are interested in joining the Delegate Assembly, contact the Internal Vice President at internal@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Delegates page.

The GA’s nine sponsored Projects are responsible for creating graduate-centered programming for a wide variety of campus communities. GA Project Directors and their volunteers host conferences, social and networking events, roundtables, and other events by and for graduate students. To get involved with a Project, email the Campus Affairs Vice President at cavp@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Projects page.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) 

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) is a program offered by the GSI Teaching & Resource Center and the Graduate Writing Center that enables doctoral students to create mentored research opportunities for undergraduate students at UC Berkeley. The program provides summer funding for both graduate and undergraduate participants and opportunities to share research results on campus and at national conferences.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center   GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

The Berkeley Graduate 

The Berkeley Graduate, the Graduate Assembly-sponsored publication, is always looking for guest columnists. They welcome columns from Berkeley graduate and professional students on a wide variety of topics related to student life, research, and involvement in the wider community. Columns may range from how to survive and thrive as a graduate or professional student to the latest research in your department. They especially encourage topics that document or facilitate interaction and understanding across departments.

The goal of The Berkeley Graduate is to inform and inspire graduate students by connecting them to a campus-wide community online. By tapping into the collective knowledge of this body of students, they hope students learn from each other how to make the most of their time as Berkeley students; to highlight exciting, interdisciplinary, or collaborative research at Berkeley; and to encourage participation in the broader community through outreach and volunteer work.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Berkeley Connect 

Undergraduates at Berkeley increasingly wish for a more intimate and supportive academic experience, one in which they can be part of an intellectual community comprising faculty, graduate students, their fellow undergraduates, and alumni/ae. Berkeley Connect provides just such an experience by placing participants in small discussion groups assigned to a graduate mentor, who is responsible for group meetings and one-on-one advising. In addition, the program includes informal lectures by professors, visits to Berkeley resources, panel discussions of career opportunities and graduate school, and social events in which professors, graduate students, and undergraduates can talk informally about intellectual issues.

Provided by: Berkeley Connect  

Advanced Knowledge

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

BIDS Video Archive 

The Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS) provides a collection of recorded lectures that cover a wide range of topics, tools, programming languages, and methods of analysis of interest to budding graduate student data scientists.

Provided by: Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS)  

Empirical Research Methods Workshops 

In 2007 the Center for the Study of Law and Society (CSLS) launched the CSLS Empirical Research Methods Workshop series. The series introduces Berkeley Law faculty, CSLS affiliated faculty & visiting scholars, and graduate students interested in conducting empirical research on law to a wide range of empirical methods, both quantitative and qualitative. Workshops are led by leading experts on particular methodologies. All workshops are recorded and posted on the CSLS website, along with any necessary workshop materials.

Past topics include:

  • Criminal Justice Data Analysis
  • Using Video Records to Analyze Interactions
  • Ethnography of the Global
  • Survey Research in an Era of Diversity, Polarization, and Technological Change
  • Connecting Qualitative and Quantitative Methods
  • Social Network Analysis in Sociolegal Research
Provided by: Center for the Study of Law and Society  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Communication

Conference Travel Grants 

Academic master’s and all doctoral students may apply for Conference Travel Grant funding to attend professional conferences or to participate in professional development activities; however, students in professional degrees and self-sustaining programs are not eligible. For professional conferences, grant amounts will depend on the location of the conference (up to $600 within California, $900 elsewhere in North America, including Canada and Mexico, and $1,500 outside of North America). The amounts provided for professional development support will vary depending on the actual costs, but in no case will a grant exceed $1,500. Master’s students are eligible for only one travel grant per academic career. Doctoral students are eligible for two grants per academic career, regardless of how many degrees they earn. To be eligible to apply, applicants must:

  1. Be registered for the term in which they are planning to attend the conference, which also includes payment of fees/tuitions. Note: students on filing fee are not eligible.
  2. Be in good academic standing.
  3. Be presenting a paper or poster at the conference.

Please note that grant requests to support travel to professional conferences must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor; grant requests to support professional development activities may be approved by the student’s faculty advisor or the Associate Dean for the Graduate Division. Approvals are obtained through the Slate application portal.

Provided by: Graduate Fellowships Office  

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

GSPDP 320: Academic Writing for Graduate Students 

This course provides graduate students with formal instruction in the genres and mechanics of academic writing at the graduate and professorial level. Through presentations, readings, discussion, and weekly peer editing, graduate students will develop writing and editing skills necessary for their success as graduate students and future faculty.

Course Goals

  • to familiarize graduate students with the different genres of academic writing (e.g., seminar papers, journal articles, books, grant proposals, dissertation prospecti, etc.) and how these genres vary from discipline to discipline;
  • to help graduate students become better writers by analyzing writing on both the micro (sentence) and macro (organizational) levels;
  • to teach graduate students basic skills of professional editing so that they can become better editors of their own work and that of peers;
  • to enable graduate students to apply these skills to a piece of their own writing and to the writing of peers.
Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Graduate Assembly Travel Award 

The Graduate Assembly recognizes that a graduate student’s education requires presenting at conferences and/or seminars, some of which take place in locations outside the Bay Area. Since these conference locations are out of the area, some departments may not provide full financial assistance. As a result, the GA implemented the Travel Award to assist with travel expenses associated with presenting at conferences.

The Travel Award provides funding to graduate students presenting at conferences taking place outside of the San Francisco Bay Area. These conferences must benefit the student’s educational or research endeavors. To be eligible for the Travel Award, the student must be presenting at the conference. The application includes a section to be completed by the student’s Academic Advisor or program advisor, stating their support of the applicant’s attendance at the conference.

Read about the travel award.

Funding support for GA Travel Awards is provided as part of the Peet’s Coffee for a Cause Program. A portion of every Peet’s Coffee purchase made at Cal Dining Peet’s locations helps support student programs and initiatives including graduate travel grants, student scholarships, campus sustainability programs, a basic needs skills course, and an on-campus farm and gardening program. Visit the Peet’s partner page to learn more.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Research

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Teaching

GSI Teaching Gallery 

This video series showcases examples of several common GSI activities. Some frequent kinds of classroom interactions can be difficult to visualize for instructors unfamiliar with running a section or lab but these four highly effective Berkeley GSIs generously allowed us to record a class period. Most of the videos are from one to three minutes long.

Visit the GSI Teaching Gallery.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Teaching Guide for GSIs 

The Teaching Guide is meant to give UC Berkeley GSIs well informed guidance as they begin teaching and throughout their GSI appointments as they continue to hone their skills. Most of the material was researched and developed by current and former GSIs at Berkeley, so it’s contextualized to our teaching situations, our students, and the resources the campus makes available to us.

Visit the Teaching Guide for GSIs.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

How Students Learn: Talks by UC Berkeley Faculty Researchers 

Structuring class activities and assignments that best help students learn is a difficult art to master, so GSIs do well to become informed about the practices that are most effective for student learning and what makes them effective.

On the GSI Center website, you will find links to a variety of resources that explain research on learning, which GSIs can reflect on and apply to their teaching.

Visit the How Students Learn section of the GSI Center website for more information.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

GSI Professional Standards and Ethics Online Course 

Through this course GSIs learn about policies, practices, and standards that all instructors need to know in order to perform their responsibilities professionally and ethically. The course is structured in five modules:

  • Promoting Learning through Diversity: The Inclusive Classroom
  • Teaching Students with Disabilities
  • Creating an Educational Environment Free of Sexual Harassment
  • Fostering Academic Integrity
  • GSI Responsibilities and Ethics

The goal of this online course is to enable GSIs to carry out their responsibilities in a manner that promotes student learning and their own growth as instructors while upholding the professional standards and expectations of the University. Along with the seminar on teaching and learning in higher education that GSIs take in their departments, the Teaching Conference, and the mentoring GSIs receive from the faculty member whom they teach with, this online course  provides GSIs with an excellent foundation as they begin to teach at Berkeley.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Workshops on Teaching for GSIs 

Offered each semester, the GSI Center’s Workshops on Teaching for GSIs cover a wide variety of topics related to university teaching and the GSI experience in 80 minutes. The purpose of the series is to offer GSIs, and other graduate students interested in teaching, opportunities for hands-on learning and practical discussion about pedagogy.

Notes and handouts from selected workshops are available online.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 

As a national leader in preparing graduate students for teaching, UC Berkeley is one of the few universities in the country that have a comprehensive policy on GSI mentoring. The development activities that Berkeley GSIs undertake to fulfill the requirements of this policy—the Teaching Conference, the Online Ethics Course, and the 300-level pedagogy course in their disciplines—support GSIs in their teaching at UC Berkeley, but they also help form the foundation of their teaching and leadership skills in future academic and non-academic careers. The UC Berkeley Certificate Program in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education adds to these three basic requirements participation in workshops on teaching, teaching observation, creation of a teaching portfolio, and several other development activities.

For details, please see the Certificate Program Requirements.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Award-Winning GSI Teaching Ideas 

Over 200 essays written by recipients of the Teaching Effectiveness Award (TEA), a very competitive award given each year by the Graduate Council’s Faculty Advisory Committee for GSI Affairs. Each essay identifies a problem the GSI encountered in teaching, explains the GSI’s strategy and rationale in devising a solution, and assesses the effectiveness of the solution.

Visit the Teaching Effectiveness Award section of the GSI Center website.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Professionalism

Humanists@Work 

Humanists@Work is a UC-wide initiative geared towards UC Humanities and humanistic Social Science MAs and PhDs interested in careers outside/alongside the academy.

Humanists@Work is a targeted continuation of the Mellon-funded Humanities and Changing Conceptions of Work. This initiative, which sought to examine the changing conceptions and experiences of work in the face of major economic, technological and social developments, supported multi-campus research projects, individual scholars, and a daylong workshop geared to humanities graduate students. It was out of this workshop that Humanists@Work was born.

In partnership with the Modern Language Association’s “Connected Academics: Preparing Doctoral Students of Language and Literature for a Variety of Careers” project, UCHRI’s Humanists@Work project will conduct six workshops over the next three years and work closely with language and literature departments across the University of California system to ensure that their graduate students will attend and benefit from the training and engagement and that departments will take the lead in tracking the career prospects and job placements of their respective graduates. In addition to the statewide workshops, UCHRI will create a graduate student advisory committee to assist in planning the workshops and creating content for the website.


MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


CHEM295: Special Topics in Career Development 

A pilot course offered in the College of Chemistry open to all graduate students.

 

This course navigates all aspects of the path to career from the beginning stages of the Individual Development Plan (IDP) in grad school to negotiating your starting salary.


Ph.D. Career Counseling 

The Career Center offers the opportunity to meet with a Ph.D. counselor to discuss the academic job search and the widening range of career options for Ph.D.s. If you have any questions about the academic job search process or are unsure about what other possibilities you’d like to explore, feel free to make an appointment with one of the Career Center’s Ph.D. counselors:

Andrew Green (Ph.D., Political Science, UC Berkeley ’93) taught for six years at Connecticut College before joining the staff of the Career Center on April Fool’s Day, 1997.

Debra Behrens (Ph.D., Education, UC Santa Barbara) taught at California State University before joining the Career Center.

Provided by: Career Center  

Job Search Services 

The Career Center offers a variety of job search services, including CareerMail, a letter of recommendation compiling service, a database of job listings and on-campus recruiting events, and a resume book.

If you want to receive timely updates and information about opportunities and events designed specifically for graduate students and Ph.D.s, sign up for CareerMail. To do so, register or login to Callisto and on your profile select one of the two Ph.D. specific options (Ph.D.s in the Sciences/Eng or Ph.D.s in Hum/Soc Sci). You may also sign up for one or more of the industry-oriented lists (e.g., business, Environmental, or Sciences Biological & Physical).

Letter Service compiles and sends out letters of recommendation files.

Callisto provides online listings of part-time, full-time and temporary jobs exclusively for Cal undergraduate and graduate students. Upon graduation, Ph.D.s can maintain access by purchasing an Alumni Advantage membership. Over 500 employers annually conduct 15,000 interviews on-campus for full-time and summer positions through this web-based recruiting system. Graduate students and Ph.D. Alumni members are eligible and there is no longer a recruiting fee for this service.

Resume books are a job search tool that enables you to circulate your resume to potential employers. By including your resume in one or more of 14 books, you are allowing interested employers to view your resume and contact you directly about job openings and their recruitment activities.

Provided by: Career Center  

Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty 

Offered jointly by the Graduate Writing Center (formerly Academic Services) and the GSI Teaching & Resource Center, the aim of the Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty is to enable graduate students to excel in all aspects of academic life as they pursue an advanced degree at Berkeley and transition from graduate school to future academic careers. The Institute takes place at the end of the Spring semester. Graduate students who are nearing completion of their graduate programs and beginning to prepare for the academic job market are encouraged to apply. For more information or if you have questions about the Summer Institute, please see the Graduate Division’s GSI Teaching and Resource Center website, email gsi@berkeley.edu, or call (510) 642-4456.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center   Graduate Writing Center  

Individual Development Plan (IDP) 

At UC Berkeley the Individual Development Plan (IDP) is defined as a private, dynamic, annual self-evaluation and career exploration tool for graduate students and postdocs. It is a written list of goals mapped to a timeline and includes goal setting for research projects, skills development, and career planning.

The IDP is to be written and developed by the trainee, and can serve as a framework for discussion between faculty mentor and trainee. The IDP is most meaningful if trainees (with support from their mentors) make full use of the IDP’s potential as a research agenda and career development tool, and update it annually to reflect accomplishments and changes in career and research objectives.

Learn more about Individual Development Planning.

Provided by: Visiting Scholar and Postdoc Affairs (VSPA) Program   Career Center  

Leadership

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) 

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) is a collaborative partnership between the Office of Graduate Diversity and the Graduate Assembly (GA). Its goal is to prepare undergraduate UC Berkeley students to select, apply to, and enroll in graduate school. By working with key staff and graduate student mentors, motivated undergraduates are inspired to pursue academic careers as they acquire a better understanding of how to succeed in the graduate school application process.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly   Office for Graduate Diversity  

MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


Graduate Assembly Delegates and Projects 

At UC Berkeley, every student has the power to actively engage with and change the world around them. Don’t just passively experience change in our world – help make change!

Become a Delegate and join students from across campus once a month to discuss campus and graduate student matters, direct your student leadership to action, and vote on important campus issues. Delegates represent their department or graduate student groups as voting member of the Graduate Assembly governing body and sit on influential campus-wide committees. If you are interested in joining the Delegate Assembly, contact the Internal Vice President at internal@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Delegates page.

The GA’s nine sponsored Projects are responsible for creating graduate-centered programming for a wide variety of campus communities. GA Project Directors and their volunteers host conferences, social and networking events, roundtables, and other events by and for graduate students. To get involved with a Project, email the Campus Affairs Vice President at cavp@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Projects page.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) 

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) is a program offered by the GSI Teaching & Resource Center and the Graduate Writing Center that enables doctoral students to create mentored research opportunities for undergraduate students at UC Berkeley. The program provides summer funding for both graduate and undergraduate participants and opportunities to share research results on campus and at national conferences.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center   GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

The Berkeley Graduate 

The Berkeley Graduate, the Graduate Assembly-sponsored publication, is always looking for guest columnists. They welcome columns from Berkeley graduate and professional students on a wide variety of topics related to student life, research, and involvement in the wider community. Columns may range from how to survive and thrive as a graduate or professional student to the latest research in your department. They especially encourage topics that document or facilitate interaction and understanding across departments.

The goal of The Berkeley Graduate is to inform and inspire graduate students by connecting them to a campus-wide community online. By tapping into the collective knowledge of this body of students, they hope students learn from each other how to make the most of their time as Berkeley students; to highlight exciting, interdisciplinary, or collaborative research at Berkeley; and to encourage participation in the broader community through outreach and volunteer work.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Berkeley Connect 

Undergraduates at Berkeley increasingly wish for a more intimate and supportive academic experience, one in which they can be part of an intellectual community comprising faculty, graduate students, their fellow undergraduates, and alumni/ae. Berkeley Connect provides just such an experience by placing participants in small discussion groups assigned to a graduate mentor, who is responsible for group meetings and one-on-one advising. In addition, the program includes informal lectures by professors, visits to Berkeley resources, panel discussions of career opportunities and graduate school, and social events in which professors, graduate students, and undergraduates can talk informally about intellectual issues.

Provided by: Berkeley Connect  

Advanced Knowledge

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

BIDS Video Archive 

The Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS) provides a collection of recorded lectures that cover a wide range of topics, tools, programming languages, and methods of analysis of interest to budding graduate student data scientists.

Provided by: Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS)  

Empirical Research Methods Workshops 

In 2007 the Center for the Study of Law and Society (CSLS) launched the CSLS Empirical Research Methods Workshop series. The series introduces Berkeley Law faculty, CSLS affiliated faculty & visiting scholars, and graduate students interested in conducting empirical research on law to a wide range of empirical methods, both quantitative and qualitative. Workshops are led by leading experts on particular methodologies. All workshops are recorded and posted on the CSLS website, along with any necessary workshop materials.

Past topics include:

  • Criminal Justice Data Analysis
  • Using Video Records to Analyze Interactions
  • Ethnography of the Global
  • Survey Research in an Era of Diversity, Polarization, and Technological Change
  • Connecting Qualitative and Quantitative Methods
  • Social Network Analysis in Sociolegal Research
Provided by: Center for the Study of Law and Society  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Communication

Conference Travel Grants 

Academic master’s and all doctoral students may apply for Conference Travel Grant funding to attend professional conferences or to participate in professional development activities; however, students in professional degrees and self-sustaining programs are not eligible. For professional conferences, grant amounts will depend on the location of the conference (up to $600 within California, $900 elsewhere in North America, including Canada and Mexico, and $1,500 outside of North America). The amounts provided for professional development support will vary depending on the actual costs, but in no case will a grant exceed $1,500. Master’s students are eligible for only one travel grant per academic career. Doctoral students are eligible for two grants per academic career, regardless of how many degrees they earn. To be eligible to apply, applicants must:

  1. Be registered for the term in which they are planning to attend the conference, which also includes payment of fees/tuitions. Note: students on filing fee are not eligible.
  2. Be in good academic standing.
  3. Be presenting a paper or poster at the conference.

Please note that grant requests to support travel to professional conferences must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor; grant requests to support professional development activities may be approved by the student’s faculty advisor or the Associate Dean for the Graduate Division. Approvals are obtained through the Slate application portal.

Provided by: Graduate Fellowships Office  

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

GSPDP 320: Academic Writing for Graduate Students 

This course provides graduate students with formal instruction in the genres and mechanics of academic writing at the graduate and professorial level. Through presentations, readings, discussion, and weekly peer editing, graduate students will develop writing and editing skills necessary for their success as graduate students and future faculty.

Course Goals

  • to familiarize graduate students with the different genres of academic writing (e.g., seminar papers, journal articles, books, grant proposals, dissertation prospecti, etc.) and how these genres vary from discipline to discipline;
  • to help graduate students become better writers by analyzing writing on both the micro (sentence) and macro (organizational) levels;
  • to teach graduate students basic skills of professional editing so that they can become better editors of their own work and that of peers;
  • to enable graduate students to apply these skills to a piece of their own writing and to the writing of peers.
Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Graduate Assembly Travel Award 

The Graduate Assembly recognizes that a graduate student’s education requires presenting at conferences and/or seminars, some of which take place in locations outside the Bay Area. Since these conference locations are out of the area, some departments may not provide full financial assistance. As a result, the GA implemented the Travel Award to assist with travel expenses associated with presenting at conferences.

The Travel Award provides funding to graduate students presenting at conferences taking place outside of the San Francisco Bay Area. These conferences must benefit the student’s educational or research endeavors. To be eligible for the Travel Award, the student must be presenting at the conference. The application includes a section to be completed by the student’s Academic Advisor or program advisor, stating their support of the applicant’s attendance at the conference.

Read about the travel award.

Funding support for GA Travel Awards is provided as part of the Peet’s Coffee for a Cause Program. A portion of every Peet’s Coffee purchase made at Cal Dining Peet’s locations helps support student programs and initiatives including graduate travel grants, student scholarships, campus sustainability programs, a basic needs skills course, and an on-campus farm and gardening program. Visit the Peet’s partner page to learn more.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Research

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Teaching

GSI Teaching Gallery 

This video series showcases examples of several common GSI activities. Some frequent kinds of classroom interactions can be difficult to visualize for instructors unfamiliar with running a section or lab but these four highly effective Berkeley GSIs generously allowed us to record a class period. Most of the videos are from one to three minutes long.

Visit the GSI Teaching Gallery.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Teaching Guide for GSIs 

The Teaching Guide is meant to give UC Berkeley GSIs well informed guidance as they begin teaching and throughout their GSI appointments as they continue to hone their skills. Most of the material was researched and developed by current and former GSIs at Berkeley, so it’s contextualized to our teaching situations, our students, and the resources the campus makes available to us.

Visit the Teaching Guide for GSIs.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

How Students Learn: Talks by UC Berkeley Faculty Researchers 

Structuring class activities and assignments that best help students learn is a difficult art to master, so GSIs do well to become informed about the practices that are most effective for student learning and what makes them effective.

On the GSI Center website, you will find links to a variety of resources that explain research on learning, which GSIs can reflect on and apply to their teaching.

Visit the How Students Learn section of the GSI Center website for more information.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

GSI Professional Standards and Ethics Online Course 

Through this course GSIs learn about policies, practices, and standards that all instructors need to know in order to perform their responsibilities professionally and ethically. The course is structured in five modules:

  • Promoting Learning through Diversity: The Inclusive Classroom
  • Teaching Students with Disabilities
  • Creating an Educational Environment Free of Sexual Harassment
  • Fostering Academic Integrity
  • GSI Responsibilities and Ethics

The goal of this online course is to enable GSIs to carry out their responsibilities in a manner that promotes student learning and their own growth as instructors while upholding the professional standards and expectations of the University. Along with the seminar on teaching and learning in higher education that GSIs take in their departments, the Teaching Conference, and the mentoring GSIs receive from the faculty member whom they teach with, this online course  provides GSIs with an excellent foundation as they begin to teach at Berkeley.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Workshops on Teaching for GSIs 

Offered each semester, the GSI Center’s Workshops on Teaching for GSIs cover a wide variety of topics related to university teaching and the GSI experience in 80 minutes. The purpose of the series is to offer GSIs, and other graduate students interested in teaching, opportunities for hands-on learning and practical discussion about pedagogy.

Notes and handouts from selected workshops are available online.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 

As a national leader in preparing graduate students for teaching, UC Berkeley is one of the few universities in the country that have a comprehensive policy on GSI mentoring. The development activities that Berkeley GSIs undertake to fulfill the requirements of this policy—the Teaching Conference, the Online Ethics Course, and the 300-level pedagogy course in their disciplines—support GSIs in their teaching at UC Berkeley, but they also help form the foundation of their teaching and leadership skills in future academic and non-academic careers. The UC Berkeley Certificate Program in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education adds to these three basic requirements participation in workshops on teaching, teaching observation, creation of a teaching portfolio, and several other development activities.

For details, please see the Certificate Program Requirements.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Award-Winning GSI Teaching Ideas 

Over 200 essays written by recipients of the Teaching Effectiveness Award (TEA), a very competitive award given each year by the Graduate Council’s Faculty Advisory Committee for GSI Affairs. Each essay identifies a problem the GSI encountered in teaching, explains the GSI’s strategy and rationale in devising a solution, and assesses the effectiveness of the solution.

Visit the Teaching Effectiveness Award section of the GSI Center website.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Professionalism

Humanists@Work 

Humanists@Work is a UC-wide initiative geared towards UC Humanities and humanistic Social Science MAs and PhDs interested in careers outside/alongside the academy.

Humanists@Work is a targeted continuation of the Mellon-funded Humanities and Changing Conceptions of Work. This initiative, which sought to examine the changing conceptions and experiences of work in the face of major economic, technological and social developments, supported multi-campus research projects, individual scholars, and a daylong workshop geared to humanities graduate students. It was out of this workshop that Humanists@Work was born.

In partnership with the Modern Language Association’s “Connected Academics: Preparing Doctoral Students of Language and Literature for a Variety of Careers” project, UCHRI’s Humanists@Work project will conduct six workshops over the next three years and work closely with language and literature departments across the University of California system to ensure that their graduate students will attend and benefit from the training and engagement and that departments will take the lead in tracking the career prospects and job placements of their respective graduates. In addition to the statewide workshops, UCHRI will create a graduate student advisory committee to assist in planning the workshops and creating content for the website.


MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


CHEM295: Special Topics in Career Development 

A pilot course offered in the College of Chemistry open to all graduate students.

 

This course navigates all aspects of the path to career from the beginning stages of the Individual Development Plan (IDP) in grad school to negotiating your starting salary.


Ph.D. Career Counseling 

The Career Center offers the opportunity to meet with a Ph.D. counselor to discuss the academic job search and the widening range of career options for Ph.D.s. If you have any questions about the academic job search process or are unsure about what other possibilities you’d like to explore, feel free to make an appointment with one of the Career Center’s Ph.D. counselors:

Andrew Green (Ph.D., Political Science, UC Berkeley ’93) taught for six years at Connecticut College before joining the staff of the Career Center on April Fool’s Day, 1997.

Debra Behrens (Ph.D., Education, UC Santa Barbara) taught at California State University before joining the Career Center.

Provided by: Career Center  

Job Search Services 

The Career Center offers a variety of job search services, including CareerMail, a letter of recommendation compiling service, a database of job listings and on-campus recruiting events, and a resume book.

If you want to receive timely updates and information about opportunities and events designed specifically for graduate students and Ph.D.s, sign up for CareerMail. To do so, register or login to Callisto and on your profile select one of the two Ph.D. specific options (Ph.D.s in the Sciences/Eng or Ph.D.s in Hum/Soc Sci). You may also sign up for one or more of the industry-oriented lists (e.g., business, Environmental, or Sciences Biological & Physical).

Letter Service compiles and sends out letters of recommendation files.

Callisto provides online listings of part-time, full-time and temporary jobs exclusively for Cal undergraduate and graduate students. Upon graduation, Ph.D.s can maintain access by purchasing an Alumni Advantage membership. Over 500 employers annually conduct 15,000 interviews on-campus for full-time and summer positions through this web-based recruiting system. Graduate students and Ph.D. Alumni members are eligible and there is no longer a recruiting fee for this service.

Resume books are a job search tool that enables you to circulate your resume to potential employers. By including your resume in one or more of 14 books, you are allowing interested employers to view your resume and contact you directly about job openings and their recruitment activities.

Provided by: Career Center  

Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty 

Offered jointly by the Graduate Writing Center (formerly Academic Services) and the GSI Teaching & Resource Center, the aim of the Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty is to enable graduate students to excel in all aspects of academic life as they pursue an advanced degree at Berkeley and transition from graduate school to future academic careers. The Institute takes place at the end of the Spring semester. Graduate students who are nearing completion of their graduate programs and beginning to prepare for the academic job market are encouraged to apply. For more information or if you have questions about the Summer Institute, please see the Graduate Division’s GSI Teaching and Resource Center website, email gsi@berkeley.edu, or call (510) 642-4456.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center   Graduate Writing Center  

Individual Development Plan (IDP) 

At UC Berkeley the Individual Development Plan (IDP) is defined as a private, dynamic, annual self-evaluation and career exploration tool for graduate students and postdocs. It is a written list of goals mapped to a timeline and includes goal setting for research projects, skills development, and career planning.

The IDP is to be written and developed by the trainee, and can serve as a framework for discussion between faculty mentor and trainee. The IDP is most meaningful if trainees (with support from their mentors) make full use of the IDP’s potential as a research agenda and career development tool, and update it annually to reflect accomplishments and changes in career and research objectives.

Learn more about Individual Development Planning.

Provided by: Visiting Scholar and Postdoc Affairs (VSPA) Program   Career Center  

Leadership

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) 

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) is a collaborative partnership between the Office of Graduate Diversity and the Graduate Assembly (GA). Its goal is to prepare undergraduate UC Berkeley students to select, apply to, and enroll in graduate school. By working with key staff and graduate student mentors, motivated undergraduates are inspired to pursue academic careers as they acquire a better understanding of how to succeed in the graduate school application process.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly   Office for Graduate Diversity  

MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


Graduate Assembly Delegates and Projects 

At UC Berkeley, every student has the power to actively engage with and change the world around them. Don’t just passively experience change in our world – help make change!

Become a Delegate and join students from across campus once a month to discuss campus and graduate student matters, direct your student leadership to action, and vote on important campus issues. Delegates represent their department or graduate student groups as voting member of the Graduate Assembly governing body and sit on influential campus-wide committees. If you are interested in joining the Delegate Assembly, contact the Internal Vice President at internal@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Delegates page.

The GA’s nine sponsored Projects are responsible for creating graduate-centered programming for a wide variety of campus communities. GA Project Directors and their volunteers host conferences, social and networking events, roundtables, and other events by and for graduate students. To get involved with a Project, email the Campus Affairs Vice President at cavp@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Projects page.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) 

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) is a program offered by the GSI Teaching & Resource Center and the Graduate Writing Center that enables doctoral students to create mentored research opportunities for undergraduate students at UC Berkeley. The program provides summer funding for both graduate and undergraduate participants and opportunities to share research results on campus and at national conferences.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center   GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

The Berkeley Graduate 

The Berkeley Graduate, the Graduate Assembly-sponsored publication, is always looking for guest columnists. They welcome columns from Berkeley graduate and professional students on a wide variety of topics related to student life, research, and involvement in the wider community. Columns may range from how to survive and thrive as a graduate or professional student to the latest research in your department. They especially encourage topics that document or facilitate interaction and understanding across departments.

The goal of The Berkeley Graduate is to inform and inspire graduate students by connecting them to a campus-wide community online. By tapping into the collective knowledge of this body of students, they hope students learn from each other how to make the most of their time as Berkeley students; to highlight exciting, interdisciplinary, or collaborative research at Berkeley; and to encourage participation in the broader community through outreach and volunteer work.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Berkeley Connect 

Undergraduates at Berkeley increasingly wish for a more intimate and supportive academic experience, one in which they can be part of an intellectual community comprising faculty, graduate students, their fellow undergraduates, and alumni/ae. Berkeley Connect provides just such an experience by placing participants in small discussion groups assigned to a graduate mentor, who is responsible for group meetings and one-on-one advising. In addition, the program includes informal lectures by professors, visits to Berkeley resources, panel discussions of career opportunities and graduate school, and social events in which professors, graduate students, and undergraduates can talk informally about intellectual issues.

Provided by: Berkeley Connect  

Advanced Knowledge

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

BIDS Video Archive 

The Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS) provides a collection of recorded lectures that cover a wide range of topics, tools, programming languages, and methods of analysis of interest to budding graduate student data scientists.

Provided by: Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS)  

Empirical Research Methods Workshops 

In 2007 the Center for the Study of Law and Society (CSLS) launched the CSLS Empirical Research Methods Workshop series. The series introduces Berkeley Law faculty, CSLS affiliated faculty & visiting scholars, and graduate students interested in conducting empirical research on law to a wide range of empirical methods, both quantitative and qualitative. Workshops are led by leading experts on particular methodologies. All workshops are recorded and posted on the CSLS website, along with any necessary workshop materials.

Past topics include:

  • Criminal Justice Data Analysis
  • Using Video Records to Analyze Interactions
  • Ethnography of the Global
  • Survey Research in an Era of Diversity, Polarization, and Technological Change
  • Connecting Qualitative and Quantitative Methods
  • Social Network Analysis in Sociolegal Research
Provided by: Center for the Study of Law and Society  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Communication

Conference Travel Grants 

Academic master’s and all doctoral students may apply for Conference Travel Grant funding to attend professional conferences or to participate in professional development activities; however, students in professional degrees and self-sustaining programs are not eligible. For professional conferences, grant amounts will depend on the location of the conference (up to $600 within California, $900 elsewhere in North America, including Canada and Mexico, and $1,500 outside of North America). The amounts provided for professional development support will vary depending on the actual costs, but in no case will a grant exceed $1,500. Master’s students are eligible for only one travel grant per academic career. Doctoral students are eligible for two grants per academic career, regardless of how many degrees they earn. To be eligible to apply, applicants must:

  1. Be registered for the term in which they are planning to attend the conference, which also includes payment of fees/tuitions. Note: students on filing fee are not eligible.
  2. Be in good academic standing.
  3. Be presenting a paper or poster at the conference.

Please note that grant requests to support travel to professional conferences must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor; grant requests to support professional development activities may be approved by the student’s faculty advisor or the Associate Dean for the Graduate Division. Approvals are obtained through the Slate application portal.

Provided by: Graduate Fellowships Office  

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

GSPDP 320: Academic Writing for Graduate Students 

This course provides graduate students with formal instruction in the genres and mechanics of academic writing at the graduate and professorial level. Through presentations, readings, discussion, and weekly peer editing, graduate students will develop writing and editing skills necessary for their success as graduate students and future faculty.

Course Goals

  • to familiarize graduate students with the different genres of academic writing (e.g., seminar papers, journal articles, books, grant proposals, dissertation prospecti, etc.) and how these genres vary from discipline to discipline;
  • to help graduate students become better writers by analyzing writing on both the micro (sentence) and macro (organizational) levels;
  • to teach graduate students basic skills of professional editing so that they can become better editors of their own work and that of peers;
  • to enable graduate students to apply these skills to a piece of their own writing and to the writing of peers.
Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Graduate Assembly Travel Award 

The Graduate Assembly recognizes that a graduate student’s education requires presenting at conferences and/or seminars, some of which take place in locations outside the Bay Area. Since these conference locations are out of the area, some departments may not provide full financial assistance. As a result, the GA implemented the Travel Award to assist with travel expenses associated with presenting at conferences.

The Travel Award provides funding to graduate students presenting at conferences taking place outside of the San Francisco Bay Area. These conferences must benefit the student’s educational or research endeavors. To be eligible for the Travel Award, the student must be presenting at the conference. The application includes a section to be completed by the student’s Academic Advisor or program advisor, stating their support of the applicant’s attendance at the conference.

Read about the travel award.

Funding support for GA Travel Awards is provided as part of the Peet’s Coffee for a Cause Program. A portion of every Peet’s Coffee purchase made at Cal Dining Peet’s locations helps support student programs and initiatives including graduate travel grants, student scholarships, campus sustainability programs, a basic needs skills course, and an on-campus farm and gardening program. Visit the Peet’s partner page to learn more.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Research

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Teaching

GSI Teaching Gallery 

This video series showcases examples of several common GSI activities. Some frequent kinds of classroom interactions can be difficult to visualize for instructors unfamiliar with running a section or lab but these four highly effective Berkeley GSIs generously allowed us to record a class period. Most of the videos are from one to three minutes long.

Visit the GSI Teaching Gallery.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Teaching Guide for GSIs 

The Teaching Guide is meant to give UC Berkeley GSIs well informed guidance as they begin teaching and throughout their GSI appointments as they continue to hone their skills. Most of the material was researched and developed by current and former GSIs at Berkeley, so it’s contextualized to our teaching situations, our students, and the resources the campus makes available to us.

Visit the Teaching Guide for GSIs.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

How Students Learn: Talks by UC Berkeley Faculty Researchers 

Structuring class activities and assignments that best help students learn is a difficult art to master, so GSIs do well to become informed about the practices that are most effective for student learning and what makes them effective.

On the GSI Center website, you will find links to a variety of resources that explain research on learning, which GSIs can reflect on and apply to their teaching.

Visit the How Students Learn section of the GSI Center website for more information.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

GSI Professional Standards and Ethics Online Course 

Through this course GSIs learn about policies, practices, and standards that all instructors need to know in order to perform their responsibilities professionally and ethically. The course is structured in five modules:

  • Promoting Learning through Diversity: The Inclusive Classroom
  • Teaching Students with Disabilities
  • Creating an Educational Environment Free of Sexual Harassment
  • Fostering Academic Integrity
  • GSI Responsibilities and Ethics

The goal of this online course is to enable GSIs to carry out their responsibilities in a manner that promotes student learning and their own growth as instructors while upholding the professional standards and expectations of the University. Along with the seminar on teaching and learning in higher education that GSIs take in their departments, the Teaching Conference, and the mentoring GSIs receive from the faculty member whom they teach with, this online course  provides GSIs with an excellent foundation as they begin to teach at Berkeley.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Workshops on Teaching for GSIs 

Offered each semester, the GSI Center’s Workshops on Teaching for GSIs cover a wide variety of topics related to university teaching and the GSI experience in 80 minutes. The purpose of the series is to offer GSIs, and other graduate students interested in teaching, opportunities for hands-on learning and practical discussion about pedagogy.

Notes and handouts from selected workshops are available online.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 

As a national leader in preparing graduate students for teaching, UC Berkeley is one of the few universities in the country that have a comprehensive policy on GSI mentoring. The development activities that Berkeley GSIs undertake to fulfill the requirements of this policy—the Teaching Conference, the Online Ethics Course, and the 300-level pedagogy course in their disciplines—support GSIs in their teaching at UC Berkeley, but they also help form the foundation of their teaching and leadership skills in future academic and non-academic careers. The UC Berkeley Certificate Program in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education adds to these three basic requirements participation in workshops on teaching, teaching observation, creation of a teaching portfolio, and several other development activities.

For details, please see the Certificate Program Requirements.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Award-Winning GSI Teaching Ideas 

Over 200 essays written by recipients of the Teaching Effectiveness Award (TEA), a very competitive award given each year by the Graduate Council’s Faculty Advisory Committee for GSI Affairs. Each essay identifies a problem the GSI encountered in teaching, explains the GSI’s strategy and rationale in devising a solution, and assesses the effectiveness of the solution.

Visit the Teaching Effectiveness Award section of the GSI Center website.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Professionalism

Humanists@Work 

Humanists@Work is a UC-wide initiative geared towards UC Humanities and humanistic Social Science MAs and PhDs interested in careers outside/alongside the academy.

Humanists@Work is a targeted continuation of the Mellon-funded Humanities and Changing Conceptions of Work. This initiative, which sought to examine the changing conceptions and experiences of work in the face of major economic, technological and social developments, supported multi-campus research projects, individual scholars, and a daylong workshop geared to humanities graduate students. It was out of this workshop that Humanists@Work was born.

In partnership with the Modern Language Association’s “Connected Academics: Preparing Doctoral Students of Language and Literature for a Variety of Careers” project, UCHRI’s Humanists@Work project will conduct six workshops over the next three years and work closely with language and literature departments across the University of California system to ensure that their graduate students will attend and benefit from the training and engagement and that departments will take the lead in tracking the career prospects and job placements of their respective graduates. In addition to the statewide workshops, UCHRI will create a graduate student advisory committee to assist in planning the workshops and creating content for the website.


MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


CHEM295: Special Topics in Career Development 

A pilot course offered in the College of Chemistry open to all graduate students.

 

This course navigates all aspects of the path to career from the beginning stages of the Individual Development Plan (IDP) in grad school to negotiating your starting salary.


Ph.D. Career Counseling 

The Career Center offers the opportunity to meet with a Ph.D. counselor to discuss the academic job search and the widening range of career options for Ph.D.s. If you have any questions about the academic job search process or are unsure about what other possibilities you’d like to explore, feel free to make an appointment with one of the Career Center’s Ph.D. counselors:

Andrew Green (Ph.D., Political Science, UC Berkeley ’93) taught for six years at Connecticut College before joining the staff of the Career Center on April Fool’s Day, 1997.

Debra Behrens (Ph.D., Education, UC Santa Barbara) taught at California State University before joining the Career Center.

Provided by: Career Center  

Job Search Services 

The Career Center offers a variety of job search services, including CareerMail, a letter of recommendation compiling service, a database of job listings and on-campus recruiting events, and a resume book.

If you want to receive timely updates and information about opportunities and events designed specifically for graduate students and Ph.D.s, sign up for CareerMail. To do so, register or login to Callisto and on your profile select one of the two Ph.D. specific options (Ph.D.s in the Sciences/Eng or Ph.D.s in Hum/Soc Sci). You may also sign up for one or more of the industry-oriented lists (e.g., business, Environmental, or Sciences Biological & Physical).

Letter Service compiles and sends out letters of recommendation files.

Callisto provides online listings of part-time, full-time and temporary jobs exclusively for Cal undergraduate and graduate students. Upon graduation, Ph.D.s can maintain access by purchasing an Alumni Advantage membership. Over 500 employers annually conduct 15,000 interviews on-campus for full-time and summer positions through this web-based recruiting system. Graduate students and Ph.D. Alumni members are eligible and there is no longer a recruiting fee for this service.

Resume books are a job search tool that enables you to circulate your resume to potential employers. By including your resume in one or more of 14 books, you are allowing interested employers to view your resume and contact you directly about job openings and their recruitment activities.

Provided by: Career Center  

Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty 

Offered jointly by the Graduate Writing Center (formerly Academic Services) and the GSI Teaching & Resource Center, the aim of the Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty is to enable graduate students to excel in all aspects of academic life as they pursue an advanced degree at Berkeley and transition from graduate school to future academic careers. The Institute takes place at the end of the Spring semester. Graduate students who are nearing completion of their graduate programs and beginning to prepare for the academic job market are encouraged to apply. For more information or if you have questions about the Summer Institute, please see the Graduate Division’s GSI Teaching and Resource Center website, email gsi@berkeley.edu, or call (510) 642-4456.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center   Graduate Writing Center  

Individual Development Plan (IDP) 

At UC Berkeley the Individual Development Plan (IDP) is defined as a private, dynamic, annual self-evaluation and career exploration tool for graduate students and postdocs. It is a written list of goals mapped to a timeline and includes goal setting for research projects, skills development, and career planning.

The IDP is to be written and developed by the trainee, and can serve as a framework for discussion between faculty mentor and trainee. The IDP is most meaningful if trainees (with support from their mentors) make full use of the IDP’s potential as a research agenda and career development tool, and update it annually to reflect accomplishments and changes in career and research objectives.

Learn more about Individual Development Planning.

Provided by: Visiting Scholar and Postdoc Affairs (VSPA) Program   Career Center  

Leadership

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) 

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) is a collaborative partnership between the Office of Graduate Diversity and the Graduate Assembly (GA). Its goal is to prepare undergraduate UC Berkeley students to select, apply to, and enroll in graduate school. By working with key staff and graduate student mentors, motivated undergraduates are inspired to pursue academic careers as they acquire a better understanding of how to succeed in the graduate school application process.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly   Office for Graduate Diversity  

MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


Graduate Assembly Delegates and Projects 

At UC Berkeley, every student has the power to actively engage with and change the world around them. Don’t just passively experience change in our world – help make change!

Become a Delegate and join students from across campus once a month to discuss campus and graduate student matters, direct your student leadership to action, and vote on important campus issues. Delegates represent their department or graduate student groups as voting member of the Graduate Assembly governing body and sit on influential campus-wide committees. If you are interested in joining the Delegate Assembly, contact the Internal Vice President at internal@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Delegates page.

The GA’s nine sponsored Projects are responsible for creating graduate-centered programming for a wide variety of campus communities. GA Project Directors and their volunteers host conferences, social and networking events, roundtables, and other events by and for graduate students. To get involved with a Project, email the Campus Affairs Vice President at cavp@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Projects page.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) 

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) is a program offered by the GSI Teaching & Resource Center and the Graduate Writing Center that enables doctoral students to create mentored research opportunities for undergraduate students at UC Berkeley. The program provides summer funding for both graduate and undergraduate participants and opportunities to share research results on campus and at national conferences.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center   GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

The Berkeley Graduate 

The Berkeley Graduate, the Graduate Assembly-sponsored publication, is always looking for guest columnists. They welcome columns from Berkeley graduate and professional students on a wide variety of topics related to student life, research, and involvement in the wider community. Columns may range from how to survive and thrive as a graduate or professional student to the latest research in your department. They especially encourage topics that document or facilitate interaction and understanding across departments.

The goal of The Berkeley Graduate is to inform and inspire graduate students by connecting them to a campus-wide community online. By tapping into the collective knowledge of this body of students, they hope students learn from each other how to make the most of their time as Berkeley students; to highlight exciting, interdisciplinary, or collaborative research at Berkeley; and to encourage participation in the broader community through outreach and volunteer work.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Berkeley Connect 

Undergraduates at Berkeley increasingly wish for a more intimate and supportive academic experience, one in which they can be part of an intellectual community comprising faculty, graduate students, their fellow undergraduates, and alumni/ae. Berkeley Connect provides just such an experience by placing participants in small discussion groups assigned to a graduate mentor, who is responsible for group meetings and one-on-one advising. In addition, the program includes informal lectures by professors, visits to Berkeley resources, panel discussions of career opportunities and graduate school, and social events in which professors, graduate students, and undergraduates can talk informally about intellectual issues.

Provided by: Berkeley Connect  

Advanced Knowledge

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

BIDS Video Archive 

The Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS) provides a collection of recorded lectures that cover a wide range of topics, tools, programming languages, and methods of analysis of interest to budding graduate student data scientists.

Provided by: Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS)  

Empirical Research Methods Workshops 

In 2007 the Center for the Study of Law and Society (CSLS) launched the CSLS Empirical Research Methods Workshop series. The series introduces Berkeley Law faculty, CSLS affiliated faculty & visiting scholars, and graduate students interested in conducting empirical research on law to a wide range of empirical methods, both quantitative and qualitative. Workshops are led by leading experts on particular methodologies. All workshops are recorded and posted on the CSLS website, along with any necessary workshop materials.

Past topics include:

  • Criminal Justice Data Analysis
  • Using Video Records to Analyze Interactions
  • Ethnography of the Global
  • Survey Research in an Era of Diversity, Polarization, and Technological Change
  • Connecting Qualitative and Quantitative Methods
  • Social Network Analysis in Sociolegal Research
Provided by: Center for the Study of Law and Society  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Communication

Conference Travel Grants 

Academic master’s and all doctoral students may apply for Conference Travel Grant funding to attend professional conferences or to participate in professional development activities; however, students in professional degrees and self-sustaining programs are not eligible. For professional conferences, grant amounts will depend on the location of the conference (up to $600 within California, $900 elsewhere in North America, including Canada and Mexico, and $1,500 outside of North America). The amounts provided for professional development support will vary depending on the actual costs, but in no case will a grant exceed $1,500. Master’s students are eligible for only one travel grant per academic career. Doctoral students are eligible for two grants per academic career, regardless of how many degrees they earn. To be eligible to apply, applicants must:

  1. Be registered for the term in which they are planning to attend the conference, which also includes payment of fees/tuitions. Note: students on filing fee are not eligible.
  2. Be in good academic standing.
  3. Be presenting a paper or poster at the conference.

Please note that grant requests to support travel to professional conferences must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor; grant requests to support professional development activities may be approved by the student’s faculty advisor or the Associate Dean for the Graduate Division. Approvals are obtained through the Slate application portal.

Provided by: Graduate Fellowships Office  

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

GSPDP 320: Academic Writing for Graduate Students 

This course provides graduate students with formal instruction in the genres and mechanics of academic writing at the graduate and professorial level. Through presentations, readings, discussion, and weekly peer editing, graduate students will develop writing and editing skills necessary for their success as graduate students and future faculty.

Course Goals

  • to familiarize graduate students with the different genres of academic writing (e.g., seminar papers, journal articles, books, grant proposals, dissertation prospecti, etc.) and how these genres vary from discipline to discipline;
  • to help graduate students become better writers by analyzing writing on both the micro (sentence) and macro (organizational) levels;
  • to teach graduate students basic skills of professional editing so that they can become better editors of their own work and that of peers;
  • to enable graduate students to apply these skills to a piece of their own writing and to the writing of peers.
Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Graduate Assembly Travel Award 

The Graduate Assembly recognizes that a graduate student’s education requires presenting at conferences and/or seminars, some of which take place in locations outside the Bay Area. Since these conference locations are out of the area, some departments may not provide full financial assistance. As a result, the GA implemented the Travel Award to assist with travel expenses associated with presenting at conferences.

The Travel Award provides funding to graduate students presenting at conferences taking place outside of the San Francisco Bay Area. These conferences must benefit the student’s educational or research endeavors. To be eligible for the Travel Award, the student must be presenting at the conference. The application includes a section to be completed by the student’s Academic Advisor or program advisor, stating their support of the applicant’s attendance at the conference.

Read about the travel award.

Funding support for GA Travel Awards is provided as part of the Peet’s Coffee for a Cause Program. A portion of every Peet’s Coffee purchase made at Cal Dining Peet’s locations helps support student programs and initiatives including graduate travel grants, student scholarships, campus sustainability programs, a basic needs skills course, and an on-campus farm and gardening program. Visit the Peet’s partner page to learn more.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Research

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Teaching

GSI Teaching Gallery 

This video series showcases examples of several common GSI activities. Some frequent kinds of classroom interactions can be difficult to visualize for instructors unfamiliar with running a section or lab but these four highly effective Berkeley GSIs generously allowed us to record a class period. Most of the videos are from one to three minutes long.

Visit the GSI Teaching Gallery.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Teaching Guide for GSIs 

The Teaching Guide is meant to give UC Berkeley GSIs well informed guidance as they begin teaching and throughout their GSI appointments as they continue to hone their skills. Most of the material was researched and developed by current and former GSIs at Berkeley, so it’s contextualized to our teaching situations, our students, and the resources the campus makes available to us.

Visit the Teaching Guide for GSIs.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

How Students Learn: Talks by UC Berkeley Faculty Researchers 

Structuring class activities and assignments that best help students learn is a difficult art to master, so GSIs do well to become informed about the practices that are most effective for student learning and what makes them effective.

On the GSI Center website, you will find links to a variety of resources that explain research on learning, which GSIs can reflect on and apply to their teaching.

Visit the How Students Learn section of the GSI Center website for more information.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

GSI Professional Standards and Ethics Online Course 

Through this course GSIs learn about policies, practices, and standards that all instructors need to know in order to perform their responsibilities professionally and ethically. The course is structured in five modules:

  • Promoting Learning through Diversity: The Inclusive Classroom
  • Teaching Students with Disabilities
  • Creating an Educational Environment Free of Sexual Harassment
  • Fostering Academic Integrity
  • GSI Responsibilities and Ethics

The goal of this online course is to enable GSIs to carry out their responsibilities in a manner that promotes student learning and their own growth as instructors while upholding the professional standards and expectations of the University. Along with the seminar on teaching and learning in higher education that GSIs take in their departments, the Teaching Conference, and the mentoring GSIs receive from the faculty member whom they teach with, this online course  provides GSIs with an excellent foundation as they begin to teach at Berkeley.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Workshops on Teaching for GSIs 

Offered each semester, the GSI Center’s Workshops on Teaching for GSIs cover a wide variety of topics related to university teaching and the GSI experience in 80 minutes. The purpose of the series is to offer GSIs, and other graduate students interested in teaching, opportunities for hands-on learning and practical discussion about pedagogy.

Notes and handouts from selected workshops are available online.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 

As a national leader in preparing graduate students for teaching, UC Berkeley is one of the few universities in the country that have a comprehensive policy on GSI mentoring. The development activities that Berkeley GSIs undertake to fulfill the requirements of this policy—the Teaching Conference, the Online Ethics Course, and the 300-level pedagogy course in their disciplines—support GSIs in their teaching at UC Berkeley, but they also help form the foundation of their teaching and leadership skills in future academic and non-academic careers. The UC Berkeley Certificate Program in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education adds to these three basic requirements participation in workshops on teaching, teaching observation, creation of a teaching portfolio, and several other development activities.

For details, please see the Certificate Program Requirements.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Award-Winning GSI Teaching Ideas 

Over 200 essays written by recipients of the Teaching Effectiveness Award (TEA), a very competitive award given each year by the Graduate Council’s Faculty Advisory Committee for GSI Affairs. Each essay identifies a problem the GSI encountered in teaching, explains the GSI’s strategy and rationale in devising a solution, and assesses the effectiveness of the solution.

Visit the Teaching Effectiveness Award section of the GSI Center website.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Professionalism

Humanists@Work 

Humanists@Work is a UC-wide initiative geared towards UC Humanities and humanistic Social Science MAs and PhDs interested in careers outside/alongside the academy.

Humanists@Work is a targeted continuation of the Mellon-funded Humanities and Changing Conceptions of Work. This initiative, which sought to examine the changing conceptions and experiences of work in the face of major economic, technological and social developments, supported multi-campus research projects, individual scholars, and a daylong workshop geared to humanities graduate students. It was out of this workshop that Humanists@Work was born.

In partnership with the Modern Language Association’s “Connected Academics: Preparing Doctoral Students of Language and Literature for a Variety of Careers” project, UCHRI’s Humanists@Work project will conduct six workshops over the next three years and work closely with language and literature departments across the University of California system to ensure that their graduate students will attend and benefit from the training and engagement and that departments will take the lead in tracking the career prospects and job placements of their respective graduates. In addition to the statewide workshops, UCHRI will create a graduate student advisory committee to assist in planning the workshops and creating content for the website.


MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


CHEM295: Special Topics in Career Development 

A pilot course offered in the College of Chemistry open to all graduate students.

 

This course navigates all aspects of the path to career from the beginning stages of the Individual Development Plan (IDP) in grad school to negotiating your starting salary.


Ph.D. Career Counseling 

The Career Center offers the opportunity to meet with a Ph.D. counselor to discuss the academic job search and the widening range of career options for Ph.D.s. If you have any questions about the academic job search process or are unsure about what other possibilities you’d like to explore, feel free to make an appointment with one of the Career Center’s Ph.D. counselors:

Andrew Green (Ph.D., Political Science, UC Berkeley ’93) taught for six years at Connecticut College before joining the staff of the Career Center on April Fool’s Day, 1997.

Debra Behrens (Ph.D., Education, UC Santa Barbara) taught at California State University before joining the Career Center.

Provided by: Career Center  

Job Search Services 

The Career Center offers a variety of job search services, including CareerMail, a letter of recommendation compiling service, a database of job listings and on-campus recruiting events, and a resume book.

If you want to receive timely updates and information about opportunities and events designed specifically for graduate students and Ph.D.s, sign up for CareerMail. To do so, register or login to Callisto and on your profile select one of the two Ph.D. specific options (Ph.D.s in the Sciences/Eng or Ph.D.s in Hum/Soc Sci). You may also sign up for one or more of the industry-oriented lists (e.g., business, Environmental, or Sciences Biological & Physical).

Letter Service compiles and sends out letters of recommendation files.

Callisto provides online listings of part-time, full-time and temporary jobs exclusively for Cal undergraduate and graduate students. Upon graduation, Ph.D.s can maintain access by purchasing an Alumni Advantage membership. Over 500 employers annually conduct 15,000 interviews on-campus for full-time and summer positions through this web-based recruiting system. Graduate students and Ph.D. Alumni members are eligible and there is no longer a recruiting fee for this service.

Resume books are a job search tool that enables you to circulate your resume to potential employers. By including your resume in one or more of 14 books, you are allowing interested employers to view your resume and contact you directly about job openings and their recruitment activities.

Provided by: Career Center  

Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty 

Offered jointly by the Graduate Writing Center (formerly Academic Services) and the GSI Teaching & Resource Center, the aim of the Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty is to enable graduate students to excel in all aspects of academic life as they pursue an advanced degree at Berkeley and transition from graduate school to future academic careers. The Institute takes place at the end of the Spring semester. Graduate students who are nearing completion of their graduate programs and beginning to prepare for the academic job market are encouraged to apply. For more information or if you have questions about the Summer Institute, please see the Graduate Division’s GSI Teaching and Resource Center website, email gsi@berkeley.edu, or call (510) 642-4456.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center   Graduate Writing Center  

Individual Development Plan (IDP) 

At UC Berkeley the Individual Development Plan (IDP) is defined as a private, dynamic, annual self-evaluation and career exploration tool for graduate students and postdocs. It is a written list of goals mapped to a timeline and includes goal setting for research projects, skills development, and career planning.

The IDP is to be written and developed by the trainee, and can serve as a framework for discussion between faculty mentor and trainee. The IDP is most meaningful if trainees (with support from their mentors) make full use of the IDP’s potential as a research agenda and career development tool, and update it annually to reflect accomplishments and changes in career and research objectives.

Learn more about Individual Development Planning.

Provided by: Visiting Scholar and Postdoc Affairs (VSPA) Program   Career Center  

Leadership

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) 

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) is a collaborative partnership between the Office of Graduate Diversity and the Graduate Assembly (GA). Its goal is to prepare undergraduate UC Berkeley students to select, apply to, and enroll in graduate school. By working with key staff and graduate student mentors, motivated undergraduates are inspired to pursue academic careers as they acquire a better understanding of how to succeed in the graduate school application process.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly   Office for Graduate Diversity  

MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


Graduate Assembly Delegates and Projects 

At UC Berkeley, every student has the power to actively engage with and change the world around them. Don’t just passively experience change in our world – help make change!

Become a Delegate and join students from across campus once a month to discuss campus and graduate student matters, direct your student leadership to action, and vote on important campus issues. Delegates represent their department or graduate student groups as voting member of the Graduate Assembly governing body and sit on influential campus-wide committees. If you are interested in joining the Delegate Assembly, contact the Internal Vice President at internal@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Delegates page.

The GA’s nine sponsored Projects are responsible for creating graduate-centered programming for a wide variety of campus communities. GA Project Directors and their volunteers host conferences, social and networking events, roundtables, and other events by and for graduate students. To get involved with a Project, email the Campus Affairs Vice President at cavp@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Projects page.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) 

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) is a program offered by the GSI Teaching & Resource Center and the Graduate Writing Center that enables doctoral students to create mentored research opportunities for undergraduate students at UC Berkeley. The program provides summer funding for both graduate and undergraduate participants and opportunities to share research results on campus and at national conferences.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center   GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

The Berkeley Graduate 

The Berkeley Graduate, the Graduate Assembly-sponsored publication, is always looking for guest columnists. They welcome columns from Berkeley graduate and professional students on a wide variety of topics related to student life, research, and involvement in the wider community. Columns may range from how to survive and thrive as a graduate or professional student to the latest research in your department. They especially encourage topics that document or facilitate interaction and understanding across departments.

The goal of The Berkeley Graduate is to inform and inspire graduate students by connecting them to a campus-wide community online. By tapping into the collective knowledge of this body of students, they hope students learn from each other how to make the most of their time as Berkeley students; to highlight exciting, interdisciplinary, or collaborative research at Berkeley; and to encourage participation in the broader community through outreach and volunteer work.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Berkeley Connect 

Undergraduates at Berkeley increasingly wish for a more intimate and supportive academic experience, one in which they can be part of an intellectual community comprising faculty, graduate students, their fellow undergraduates, and alumni/ae. Berkeley Connect provides just such an experience by placing participants in small discussion groups assigned to a graduate mentor, who is responsible for group meetings and one-on-one advising. In addition, the program includes informal lectures by professors, visits to Berkeley resources, panel discussions of career opportunities and graduate school, and social events in which professors, graduate students, and undergraduates can talk informally about intellectual issues.

Provided by: Berkeley Connect  

Advanced Knowledge

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

BIDS Video Archive 

The Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS) provides a collection of recorded lectures that cover a wide range of topics, tools, programming languages, and methods of analysis of interest to budding graduate student data scientists.

Provided by: Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS)  

Empirical Research Methods Workshops 

In 2007 the Center for the Study of Law and Society (CSLS) launched the CSLS Empirical Research Methods Workshop series. The series introduces Berkeley Law faculty, CSLS affiliated faculty & visiting scholars, and graduate students interested in conducting empirical research on law to a wide range of empirical methods, both quantitative and qualitative. Workshops are led by leading experts on particular methodologies. All workshops are recorded and posted on the CSLS website, along with any necessary workshop materials.

Past topics include:

  • Criminal Justice Data Analysis
  • Using Video Records to Analyze Interactions
  • Ethnography of the Global
  • Survey Research in an Era of Diversity, Polarization, and Technological Change
  • Connecting Qualitative and Quantitative Methods
  • Social Network Analysis in Sociolegal Research
Provided by: Center for the Study of Law and Society  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Communication

Conference Travel Grants 

Academic master’s and all doctoral students may apply for Conference Travel Grant funding to attend professional conferences or to participate in professional development activities; however, students in professional degrees and self-sustaining programs are not eligible. For professional conferences, grant amounts will depend on the location of the conference (up to $600 within California, $900 elsewhere in North America, including Canada and Mexico, and $1,500 outside of North America). The amounts provided for professional development support will vary depending on the actual costs, but in no case will a grant exceed $1,500. Master’s students are eligible for only one travel grant per academic career. Doctoral students are eligible for two grants per academic career, regardless of how many degrees they earn. To be eligible to apply, applicants must:

  1. Be registered for the term in which they are planning to attend the conference, which also includes payment of fees/tuitions. Note: students on filing fee are not eligible.
  2. Be in good academic standing.
  3. Be presenting a paper or poster at the conference.

Please note that grant requests to support travel to professional conferences must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor; grant requests to support professional development activities may be approved by the student’s faculty advisor or the Associate Dean for the Graduate Division. Approvals are obtained through the Slate application portal.

Provided by: Graduate Fellowships Office  

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

GSPDP 320: Academic Writing for Graduate Students 

This course provides graduate students with formal instruction in the genres and mechanics of academic writing at the graduate and professorial level. Through presentations, readings, discussion, and weekly peer editing, graduate students will develop writing and editing skills necessary for their success as graduate students and future faculty.

Course Goals

  • to familiarize graduate students with the different genres of academic writing (e.g., seminar papers, journal articles, books, grant proposals, dissertation prospecti, etc.) and how these genres vary from discipline to discipline;
  • to help graduate students become better writers by analyzing writing on both the micro (sentence) and macro (organizational) levels;
  • to teach graduate students basic skills of professional editing so that they can become better editors of their own work and that of peers;
  • to enable graduate students to apply these skills to a piece of their own writing and to the writing of peers.
Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Graduate Assembly Travel Award 

The Graduate Assembly recognizes that a graduate student’s education requires presenting at conferences and/or seminars, some of which take place in locations outside the Bay Area. Since these conference locations are out of the area, some departments may not provide full financial assistance. As a result, the GA implemented the Travel Award to assist with travel expenses associated with presenting at conferences.

The Travel Award provides funding to graduate students presenting at conferences taking place outside of the San Francisco Bay Area. These conferences must benefit the student’s educational or research endeavors. To be eligible for the Travel Award, the student must be presenting at the conference. The application includes a section to be completed by the student’s Academic Advisor or program advisor, stating their support of the applicant’s attendance at the conference.

Read about the travel award.

Funding support for GA Travel Awards is provided as part of the Peet’s Coffee for a Cause Program. A portion of every Peet’s Coffee purchase made at Cal Dining Peet’s locations helps support student programs and initiatives including graduate travel grants, student scholarships, campus sustainability programs, a basic needs skills course, and an on-campus farm and gardening program. Visit the Peet’s partner page to learn more.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Research

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Teaching

GSI Teaching Gallery 

This video series showcases examples of several common GSI activities. Some frequent kinds of classroom interactions can be difficult to visualize for instructors unfamiliar with running a section or lab but these four highly effective Berkeley GSIs generously allowed us to record a class period. Most of the videos are from one to three minutes long.

Visit the GSI Teaching Gallery.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Teaching Guide for GSIs 

The Teaching Guide is meant to give UC Berkeley GSIs well informed guidance as they begin teaching and throughout their GSI appointments as they continue to hone their skills. Most of the material was researched and developed by current and former GSIs at Berkeley, so it’s contextualized to our teaching situations, our students, and the resources the campus makes available to us.

Visit the Teaching Guide for GSIs.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

How Students Learn: Talks by UC Berkeley Faculty Researchers 

Structuring class activities and assignments that best help students learn is a difficult art to master, so GSIs do well to become informed about the practices that are most effective for student learning and what makes them effective.

On the GSI Center website, you will find links to a variety of resources that explain research on learning, which GSIs can reflect on and apply to their teaching.

Visit the How Students Learn section of the GSI Center website for more information.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

GSI Professional Standards and Ethics Online Course 

Through this course GSIs learn about policies, practices, and standards that all instructors need to know in order to perform their responsibilities professionally and ethically. The course is structured in five modules:

  • Promoting Learning through Diversity: The Inclusive Classroom
  • Teaching Students with Disabilities
  • Creating an Educational Environment Free of Sexual Harassment
  • Fostering Academic Integrity
  • GSI Responsibilities and Ethics

The goal of this online course is to enable GSIs to carry out their responsibilities in a manner that promotes student learning and their own growth as instructors while upholding the professional standards and expectations of the University. Along with the seminar on teaching and learning in higher education that GSIs take in their departments, the Teaching Conference, and the mentoring GSIs receive from the faculty member whom they teach with, this online course  provides GSIs with an excellent foundation as they begin to teach at Berkeley.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Workshops on Teaching for GSIs 

Offered each semester, the GSI Center’s Workshops on Teaching for GSIs cover a wide variety of topics related to university teaching and the GSI experience in 80 minutes. The purpose of the series is to offer GSIs, and other graduate students interested in teaching, opportunities for hands-on learning and practical discussion about pedagogy.

Notes and handouts from selected workshops are available online.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 

As a national leader in preparing graduate students for teaching, UC Berkeley is one of the few universities in the country that have a comprehensive policy on GSI mentoring. The development activities that Berkeley GSIs undertake to fulfill the requirements of this policy—the Teaching Conference, the Online Ethics Course, and the 300-level pedagogy course in their disciplines—support GSIs in their teaching at UC Berkeley, but they also help form the foundation of their teaching and leadership skills in future academic and non-academic careers. The UC Berkeley Certificate Program in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education adds to these three basic requirements participation in workshops on teaching, teaching observation, creation of a teaching portfolio, and several other development activities.

For details, please see the Certificate Program Requirements.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Award-Winning GSI Teaching Ideas 

Over 200 essays written by recipients of the Teaching Effectiveness Award (TEA), a very competitive award given each year by the Graduate Council’s Faculty Advisory Committee for GSI Affairs. Each essay identifies a problem the GSI encountered in teaching, explains the GSI’s strategy and rationale in devising a solution, and assesses the effectiveness of the solution.

Visit the Teaching Effectiveness Award section of the GSI Center website.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Professionalism

Humanists@Work 

Humanists@Work is a UC-wide initiative geared towards UC Humanities and humanistic Social Science MAs and PhDs interested in careers outside/alongside the academy.

Humanists@Work is a targeted continuation of the Mellon-funded Humanities and Changing Conceptions of Work. This initiative, which sought to examine the changing conceptions and experiences of work in the face of major economic, technological and social developments, supported multi-campus research projects, individual scholars, and a daylong workshop geared to humanities graduate students. It was out of this workshop that Humanists@Work was born.

In partnership with the Modern Language Association’s “Connected Academics: Preparing Doctoral Students of Language and Literature for a Variety of Careers” project, UCHRI’s Humanists@Work project will conduct six workshops over the next three years and work closely with language and literature departments across the University of California system to ensure that their graduate students will attend and benefit from the training and engagement and that departments will take the lead in tracking the career prospects and job placements of their respective graduates. In addition to the statewide workshops, UCHRI will create a graduate student advisory committee to assist in planning the workshops and creating content for the website.


MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


CHEM295: Special Topics in Career Development 

A pilot course offered in the College of Chemistry open to all graduate students.

 

This course navigates all aspects of the path to career from the beginning stages of the Individual Development Plan (IDP) in grad school to negotiating your starting salary.


Ph.D. Career Counseling 

The Career Center offers the opportunity to meet with a Ph.D. counselor to discuss the academic job search and the widening range of career options for Ph.D.s. If you have any questions about the academic job search process or are unsure about what other possibilities you’d like to explore, feel free to make an appointment with one of the Career Center’s Ph.D. counselors:

Andrew Green (Ph.D., Political Science, UC Berkeley ’93) taught for six years at Connecticut College before joining the staff of the Career Center on April Fool’s Day, 1997.

Debra Behrens (Ph.D., Education, UC Santa Barbara) taught at California State University before joining the Career Center.

Provided by: Career Center  

Job Search Services 

The Career Center offers a variety of job search services, including CareerMail, a letter of recommendation compiling service, a database of job listings and on-campus recruiting events, and a resume book.

If you want to receive timely updates and information about opportunities and events designed specifically for graduate students and Ph.D.s, sign up for CareerMail. To do so, register or login to Callisto and on your profile select one of the two Ph.D. specific options (Ph.D.s in the Sciences/Eng or Ph.D.s in Hum/Soc Sci). You may also sign up for one or more of the industry-oriented lists (e.g., business, Environmental, or Sciences Biological & Physical).

Letter Service compiles and sends out letters of recommendation files.

Callisto provides online listings of part-time, full-time and temporary jobs exclusively for Cal undergraduate and graduate students. Upon graduation, Ph.D.s can maintain access by purchasing an Alumni Advantage membership. Over 500 employers annually conduct 15,000 interviews on-campus for full-time and summer positions through this web-based recruiting system. Graduate students and Ph.D. Alumni members are eligible and there is no longer a recruiting fee for this service.

Resume books are a job search tool that enables you to circulate your resume to potential employers. By including your resume in one or more of 14 books, you are allowing interested employers to view your resume and contact you directly about job openings and their recruitment activities.

Provided by: Career Center  

Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty 

Offered jointly by the Graduate Writing Center (formerly Academic Services) and the GSI Teaching & Resource Center, the aim of the Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty is to enable graduate students to excel in all aspects of academic life as they pursue an advanced degree at Berkeley and transition from graduate school to future academic careers. The Institute takes place at the end of the Spring semester. Graduate students who are nearing completion of their graduate programs and beginning to prepare for the academic job market are encouraged to apply. For more information or if you have questions about the Summer Institute, please see the Graduate Division’s GSI Teaching and Resource Center website, email gsi@berkeley.edu, or call (510) 642-4456.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center   Graduate Writing Center  

Individual Development Plan (IDP) 

At UC Berkeley the Individual Development Plan (IDP) is defined as a private, dynamic, annual self-evaluation and career exploration tool for graduate students and postdocs. It is a written list of goals mapped to a timeline and includes goal setting for research projects, skills development, and career planning.

The IDP is to be written and developed by the trainee, and can serve as a framework for discussion between faculty mentor and trainee. The IDP is most meaningful if trainees (with support from their mentors) make full use of the IDP’s potential as a research agenda and career development tool, and update it annually to reflect accomplishments and changes in career and research objectives.

Learn more about Individual Development Planning.

Provided by: Visiting Scholar and Postdoc Affairs (VSPA) Program   Career Center  

Leadership

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) 

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) is a collaborative partnership between the Office of Graduate Diversity and the Graduate Assembly (GA). Its goal is to prepare undergraduate UC Berkeley students to select, apply to, and enroll in graduate school. By working with key staff and graduate student mentors, motivated undergraduates are inspired to pursue academic careers as they acquire a better understanding of how to succeed in the graduate school application process.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly   Office for Graduate Diversity  

MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


Graduate Assembly Delegates and Projects 

At UC Berkeley, every student has the power to actively engage with and change the world around them. Don’t just passively experience change in our world – help make change!

Become a Delegate and join students from across campus once a month to discuss campus and graduate student matters, direct your student leadership to action, and vote on important campus issues. Delegates represent their department or graduate student groups as voting member of the Graduate Assembly governing body and sit on influential campus-wide committees. If you are interested in joining the Delegate Assembly, contact the Internal Vice President at internal@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Delegates page.

The GA’s nine sponsored Projects are responsible for creating graduate-centered programming for a wide variety of campus communities. GA Project Directors and their volunteers host conferences, social and networking events, roundtables, and other events by and for graduate students. To get involved with a Project, email the Campus Affairs Vice President at cavp@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Projects page.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) 

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) is a program offered by the GSI Teaching & Resource Center and the Graduate Writing Center that enables doctoral students to create mentored research opportunities for undergraduate students at UC Berkeley. The program provides summer funding for both graduate and undergraduate participants and opportunities to share research results on campus and at national conferences.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center   GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

The Berkeley Graduate 

The Berkeley Graduate, the Graduate Assembly-sponsored publication, is always looking for guest columnists. They welcome columns from Berkeley graduate and professional students on a wide variety of topics related to student life, research, and involvement in the wider community. Columns may range from how to survive and thrive as a graduate or professional student to the latest research in your department. They especially encourage topics that document or facilitate interaction and understanding across departments.

The goal of The Berkeley Graduate is to inform and inspire graduate students by connecting them to a campus-wide community online. By tapping into the collective knowledge of this body of students, they hope students learn from each other how to make the most of their time as Berkeley students; to highlight exciting, interdisciplinary, or collaborative research at Berkeley; and to encourage participation in the broader community through outreach and volunteer work.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Berkeley Connect 

Undergraduates at Berkeley increasingly wish for a more intimate and supportive academic experience, one in which they can be part of an intellectual community comprising faculty, graduate students, their fellow undergraduates, and alumni/ae. Berkeley Connect provides just such an experience by placing participants in small discussion groups assigned to a graduate mentor, who is responsible for group meetings and one-on-one advising. In addition, the program includes informal lectures by professors, visits to Berkeley resources, panel discussions of career opportunities and graduate school, and social events in which professors, graduate students, and undergraduates can talk informally about intellectual issues.

Provided by: Berkeley Connect  

Advanced Knowledge

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

BIDS Video Archive 

The Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS) provides a collection of recorded lectures that cover a wide range of topics, tools, programming languages, and methods of analysis of interest to budding graduate student data scientists.

Provided by: Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS)  

Empirical Research Methods Workshops 

In 2007 the Center for the Study of Law and Society (CSLS) launched the CSLS Empirical Research Methods Workshop series. The series introduces Berkeley Law faculty, CSLS affiliated faculty & visiting scholars, and graduate students interested in conducting empirical research on law to a wide range of empirical methods, both quantitative and qualitative. Workshops are led by leading experts on particular methodologies. All workshops are recorded and posted on the CSLS website, along with any necessary workshop materials.

Past topics include:

  • Criminal Justice Data Analysis
  • Using Video Records to Analyze Interactions
  • Ethnography of the Global
  • Survey Research in an Era of Diversity, Polarization, and Technological Change
  • Connecting Qualitative and Quantitative Methods
  • Social Network Analysis in Sociolegal Research
Provided by: Center for the Study of Law and Society  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Communication

Conference Travel Grants 

Academic master’s and all doctoral students may apply for Conference Travel Grant funding to attend professional conferences or to participate in professional development activities; however, students in professional degrees and self-sustaining programs are not eligible. For professional conferences, grant amounts will depend on the location of the conference (up to $600 within California, $900 elsewhere in North America, including Canada and Mexico, and $1,500 outside of North America). The amounts provided for professional development support will vary depending on the actual costs, but in no case will a grant exceed $1,500. Master’s students are eligible for only one travel grant per academic career. Doctoral students are eligible for two grants per academic career, regardless of how many degrees they earn. To be eligible to apply, applicants must:

  1. Be registered for the term in which they are planning to attend the conference, which also includes payment of fees/tuitions. Note: students on filing fee are not eligible.
  2. Be in good academic standing.
  3. Be presenting a paper or poster at the conference.

Please note that grant requests to support travel to professional conferences must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor; grant requests to support professional development activities may be approved by the student’s faculty advisor or the Associate Dean for the Graduate Division. Approvals are obtained through the Slate application portal.

Provided by: Graduate Fellowships Office  

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

GSPDP 320: Academic Writing for Graduate Students 

This course provides graduate students with formal instruction in the genres and mechanics of academic writing at the graduate and professorial level. Through presentations, readings, discussion, and weekly peer editing, graduate students will develop writing and editing skills necessary for their success as graduate students and future faculty.

Course Goals

  • to familiarize graduate students with the different genres of academic writing (e.g., seminar papers, journal articles, books, grant proposals, dissertation prospecti, etc.) and how these genres vary from discipline to discipline;
  • to help graduate students become better writers by analyzing writing on both the micro (sentence) and macro (organizational) levels;
  • to teach graduate students basic skills of professional editing so that they can become better editors of their own work and that of peers;
  • to enable graduate students to apply these skills to a piece of their own writing and to the writing of peers.
Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Graduate Assembly Travel Award 

The Graduate Assembly recognizes that a graduate student’s education requires presenting at conferences and/or seminars, some of which take place in locations outside the Bay Area. Since these conference locations are out of the area, some departments may not provide full financial assistance. As a result, the GA implemented the Travel Award to assist with travel expenses associated with presenting at conferences.

The Travel Award provides funding to graduate students presenting at conferences taking place outside of the San Francisco Bay Area. These conferences must benefit the student’s educational or research endeavors. To be eligible for the Travel Award, the student must be presenting at the conference. The application includes a section to be completed by the student’s Academic Advisor or program advisor, stating their support of the applicant’s attendance at the conference.

Read about the travel award.

Funding support for GA Travel Awards is provided as part of the Peet’s Coffee for a Cause Program. A portion of every Peet’s Coffee purchase made at Cal Dining Peet’s locations helps support student programs and initiatives including graduate travel grants, student scholarships, campus sustainability programs, a basic needs skills course, and an on-campus farm and gardening program. Visit the Peet’s partner page to learn more.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Research

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Teaching

GSI Teaching Gallery 

This video series showcases examples of several common GSI activities. Some frequent kinds of classroom interactions can be difficult to visualize for instructors unfamiliar with running a section or lab but these four highly effective Berkeley GSIs generously allowed us to record a class period. Most of the videos are from one to three minutes long.

Visit the GSI Teaching Gallery.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Teaching Guide for GSIs 

The Teaching Guide is meant to give UC Berkeley GSIs well informed guidance as they begin teaching and throughout their GSI appointments as they continue to hone their skills. Most of the material was researched and developed by current and former GSIs at Berkeley, so it’s contextualized to our teaching situations, our students, and the resources the campus makes available to us.

Visit the Teaching Guide for GSIs.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

How Students Learn: Talks by UC Berkeley Faculty Researchers 

Structuring class activities and assignments that best help students learn is a difficult art to master, so GSIs do well to become informed about the practices that are most effective for student learning and what makes them effective.

On the GSI Center website, you will find links to a variety of resources that explain research on learning, which GSIs can reflect on and apply to their teaching.

Visit the How Students Learn section of the GSI Center website for more information.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

GSI Professional Standards and Ethics Online Course 

Through this course GSIs learn about policies, practices, and standards that all instructors need to know in order to perform their responsibilities professionally and ethically. The course is structured in five modules:

  • Promoting Learning through Diversity: The Inclusive Classroom
  • Teaching Students with Disabilities
  • Creating an Educational Environment Free of Sexual Harassment
  • Fostering Academic Integrity
  • GSI Responsibilities and Ethics

The goal of this online course is to enable GSIs to carry out their responsibilities in a manner that promotes student learning and their own growth as instructors while upholding the professional standards and expectations of the University. Along with the seminar on teaching and learning in higher education that GSIs take in their departments, the Teaching Conference, and the mentoring GSIs receive from the faculty member whom they teach with, this online course  provides GSIs with an excellent foundation as they begin to teach at Berkeley.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Workshops on Teaching for GSIs 

Offered each semester, the GSI Center’s Workshops on Teaching for GSIs cover a wide variety of topics related to university teaching and the GSI experience in 80 minutes. The purpose of the series is to offer GSIs, and other graduate students interested in teaching, opportunities for hands-on learning and practical discussion about pedagogy.

Notes and handouts from selected workshops are available online.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 

As a national leader in preparing graduate students for teaching, UC Berkeley is one of the few universities in the country that have a comprehensive policy on GSI mentoring. The development activities that Berkeley GSIs undertake to fulfill the requirements of this policy—the Teaching Conference, the Online Ethics Course, and the 300-level pedagogy course in their disciplines—support GSIs in their teaching at UC Berkeley, but they also help form the foundation of their teaching and leadership skills in future academic and non-academic careers. The UC Berkeley Certificate Program in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education adds to these three basic requirements participation in workshops on teaching, teaching observation, creation of a teaching portfolio, and several other development activities.

For details, please see the Certificate Program Requirements.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Award-Winning GSI Teaching Ideas 

Over 200 essays written by recipients of the Teaching Effectiveness Award (TEA), a very competitive award given each year by the Graduate Council’s Faculty Advisory Committee for GSI Affairs. Each essay identifies a problem the GSI encountered in teaching, explains the GSI’s strategy and rationale in devising a solution, and assesses the effectiveness of the solution.

Visit the Teaching Effectiveness Award section of the GSI Center website.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Professionalism

Humanists@Work 

Humanists@Work is a UC-wide initiative geared towards UC Humanities and humanistic Social Science MAs and PhDs interested in careers outside/alongside the academy.

Humanists@Work is a targeted continuation of the Mellon-funded Humanities and Changing Conceptions of Work. This initiative, which sought to examine the changing conceptions and experiences of work in the face of major economic, technological and social developments, supported multi-campus research projects, individual scholars, and a daylong workshop geared to humanities graduate students. It was out of this workshop that Humanists@Work was born.

In partnership with the Modern Language Association’s “Connected Academics: Preparing Doctoral Students of Language and Literature for a Variety of Careers” project, UCHRI’s Humanists@Work project will conduct six workshops over the next three years and work closely with language and literature departments across the University of California system to ensure that their graduate students will attend and benefit from the training and engagement and that departments will take the lead in tracking the career prospects and job placements of their respective graduates. In addition to the statewide workshops, UCHRI will create a graduate student advisory committee to assist in planning the workshops and creating content for the website.


MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


CHEM295: Special Topics in Career Development 

A pilot course offered in the College of Chemistry open to all graduate students.

 

This course navigates all aspects of the path to career from the beginning stages of the Individual Development Plan (IDP) in grad school to negotiating your starting salary.


Ph.D. Career Counseling 

The Career Center offers the opportunity to meet with a Ph.D. counselor to discuss the academic job search and the widening range of career options for Ph.D.s. If you have any questions about the academic job search process or are unsure about what other possibilities you’d like to explore, feel free to make an appointment with one of the Career Center’s Ph.D. counselors:

Andrew Green (Ph.D., Political Science, UC Berkeley ’93) taught for six years at Connecticut College before joining the staff of the Career Center on April Fool’s Day, 1997.

Debra Behrens (Ph.D., Education, UC Santa Barbara) taught at California State University before joining the Career Center.

Provided by: Career Center  

Job Search Services 

The Career Center offers a variety of job search services, including CareerMail, a letter of recommendation compiling service, a database of job listings and on-campus recruiting events, and a resume book.

If you want to receive timely updates and information about opportunities and events designed specifically for graduate students and Ph.D.s, sign up for CareerMail. To do so, register or login to Callisto and on your profile select one of the two Ph.D. specific options (Ph.D.s in the Sciences/Eng or Ph.D.s in Hum/Soc Sci). You may also sign up for one or more of the industry-oriented lists (e.g., business, Environmental, or Sciences Biological & Physical).

Letter Service compiles and sends out letters of recommendation files.

Callisto provides online listings of part-time, full-time and temporary jobs exclusively for Cal undergraduate and graduate students. Upon graduation, Ph.D.s can maintain access by purchasing an Alumni Advantage membership. Over 500 employers annually conduct 15,000 interviews on-campus for full-time and summer positions through this web-based recruiting system. Graduate students and Ph.D. Alumni members are eligible and there is no longer a recruiting fee for this service.

Resume books are a job search tool that enables you to circulate your resume to potential employers. By including your resume in one or more of 14 books, you are allowing interested employers to view your resume and contact you directly about job openings and their recruitment activities.

Provided by: Career Center  

Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty 

Offered jointly by the Graduate Writing Center (formerly Academic Services) and the GSI Teaching & Resource Center, the aim of the Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty is to enable graduate students to excel in all aspects of academic life as they pursue an advanced degree at Berkeley and transition from graduate school to future academic careers. The Institute takes place at the end of the Spring semester. Graduate students who are nearing completion of their graduate programs and beginning to prepare for the academic job market are encouraged to apply. For more information or if you have questions about the Summer Institute, please see the Graduate Division’s GSI Teaching and Resource Center website, email gsi@berkeley.edu, or call (510) 642-4456.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center   Graduate Writing Center  

Individual Development Plan (IDP) 

At UC Berkeley the Individual Development Plan (IDP) is defined as a private, dynamic, annual self-evaluation and career exploration tool for graduate students and postdocs. It is a written list of goals mapped to a timeline and includes goal setting for research projects, skills development, and career planning.

The IDP is to be written and developed by the trainee, and can serve as a framework for discussion between faculty mentor and trainee. The IDP is most meaningful if trainees (with support from their mentors) make full use of the IDP’s potential as a research agenda and career development tool, and update it annually to reflect accomplishments and changes in career and research objectives.

Learn more about Individual Development Planning.

Provided by: Visiting Scholar and Postdoc Affairs (VSPA) Program   Career Center  

Leadership

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) 

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) is a collaborative partnership between the Office of Graduate Diversity and the Graduate Assembly (GA). Its goal is to prepare undergraduate UC Berkeley students to select, apply to, and enroll in graduate school. By working with key staff and graduate student mentors, motivated undergraduates are inspired to pursue academic careers as they acquire a better understanding of how to succeed in the graduate school application process.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly   Office for Graduate Diversity  

MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


Graduate Assembly Delegates and Projects 

At UC Berkeley, every student has the power to actively engage with and change the world around them. Don’t just passively experience change in our world – help make change!

Become a Delegate and join students from across campus once a month to discuss campus and graduate student matters, direct your student leadership to action, and vote on important campus issues. Delegates represent their department or graduate student groups as voting member of the Graduate Assembly governing body and sit on influential campus-wide committees. If you are interested in joining the Delegate Assembly, contact the Internal Vice President at internal@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Delegates page.

The GA’s nine sponsored Projects are responsible for creating graduate-centered programming for a wide variety of campus communities. GA Project Directors and their volunteers host conferences, social and networking events, roundtables, and other events by and for graduate students. To get involved with a Project, email the Campus Affairs Vice President at cavp@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Projects page.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) 

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) is a program offered by the GSI Teaching & Resource Center and the Graduate Writing Center that enables doctoral students to create mentored research opportunities for undergraduate students at UC Berkeley. The program provides summer funding for both graduate and undergraduate participants and opportunities to share research results on campus and at national conferences.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center   GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

The Berkeley Graduate 

The Berkeley Graduate, the Graduate Assembly-sponsored publication, is always looking for guest columnists. They welcome columns from Berkeley graduate and professional students on a wide variety of topics related to student life, research, and involvement in the wider community. Columns may range from how to survive and thrive as a graduate or professional student to the latest research in your department. They especially encourage topics that document or facilitate interaction and understanding across departments.

The goal of The Berkeley Graduate is to inform and inspire graduate students by connecting them to a campus-wide community online. By tapping into the collective knowledge of this body of students, they hope students learn from each other how to make the most of their time as Berkeley students; to highlight exciting, interdisciplinary, or collaborative research at Berkeley; and to encourage participation in the broader community through outreach and volunteer work.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Berkeley Connect 

Undergraduates at Berkeley increasingly wish for a more intimate and supportive academic experience, one in which they can be part of an intellectual community comprising faculty, graduate students, their fellow undergraduates, and alumni/ae. Berkeley Connect provides just such an experience by placing participants in small discussion groups assigned to a graduate mentor, who is responsible for group meetings and one-on-one advising. In addition, the program includes informal lectures by professors, visits to Berkeley resources, panel discussions of career opportunities and graduate school, and social events in which professors, graduate students, and undergraduates can talk informally about intellectual issues.

Provided by: Berkeley Connect  

Advanced Knowledge

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

BIDS Video Archive 

The Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS) provides a collection of recorded lectures that cover a wide range of topics, tools, programming languages, and methods of analysis of interest to budding graduate student data scientists.

Provided by: Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS)  

Empirical Research Methods Workshops 

In 2007 the Center for the Study of Law and Society (CSLS) launched the CSLS Empirical Research Methods Workshop series. The series introduces Berkeley Law faculty, CSLS affiliated faculty & visiting scholars, and graduate students interested in conducting empirical research on law to a wide range of empirical methods, both quantitative and qualitative. Workshops are led by leading experts on particular methodologies. All workshops are recorded and posted on the CSLS website, along with any necessary workshop materials.

Past topics include:

  • Criminal Justice Data Analysis
  • Using Video Records to Analyze Interactions
  • Ethnography of the Global
  • Survey Research in an Era of Diversity, Polarization, and Technological Change
  • Connecting Qualitative and Quantitative Methods
  • Social Network Analysis in Sociolegal Research
Provided by: Center for the Study of Law and Society  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Communication

Conference Travel Grants 

Academic master’s and all doctoral students may apply for Conference Travel Grant funding to attend professional conferences or to participate in professional development activities; however, students in professional degrees and self-sustaining programs are not eligible. For professional conferences, grant amounts will depend on the location of the conference (up to $600 within California, $900 elsewhere in North America, including Canada and Mexico, and $1,500 outside of North America). The amounts provided for professional development support will vary depending on the actual costs, but in no case will a grant exceed $1,500. Master’s students are eligible for only one travel grant per academic career. Doctoral students are eligible for two grants per academic career, regardless of how many degrees they earn. To be eligible to apply, applicants must:

  1. Be registered for the term in which they are planning to attend the conference, which also includes payment of fees/tuitions. Note: students on filing fee are not eligible.
  2. Be in good academic standing.
  3. Be presenting a paper or poster at the conference.

Please note that grant requests to support travel to professional conferences must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor; grant requests to support professional development activities may be approved by the student’s faculty advisor or the Associate Dean for the Graduate Division. Approvals are obtained through the Slate application portal.

Provided by: Graduate Fellowships Office  

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

GSPDP 320: Academic Writing for Graduate Students 

This course provides graduate students with formal instruction in the genres and mechanics of academic writing at the graduate and professorial level. Through presentations, readings, discussion, and weekly peer editing, graduate students will develop writing and editing skills necessary for their success as graduate students and future faculty.

Course Goals

  • to familiarize graduate students with the different genres of academic writing (e.g., seminar papers, journal articles, books, grant proposals, dissertation prospecti, etc.) and how these genres vary from discipline to discipline;
  • to help graduate students become better writers by analyzing writing on both the micro (sentence) and macro (organizational) levels;
  • to teach graduate students basic skills of professional editing so that they can become better editors of their own work and that of peers;
  • to enable graduate students to apply these skills to a piece of their own writing and to the writing of peers.
Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Graduate Assembly Travel Award 

The Graduate Assembly recognizes that a graduate student’s education requires presenting at conferences and/or seminars, some of which take place in locations outside the Bay Area. Since these conference locations are out of the area, some departments may not provide full financial assistance. As a result, the GA implemented the Travel Award to assist with travel expenses associated with presenting at conferences.

The Travel Award provides funding to graduate students presenting at conferences taking place outside of the San Francisco Bay Area. These conferences must benefit the student’s educational or research endeavors. To be eligible for the Travel Award, the student must be presenting at the conference. The application includes a section to be completed by the student’s Academic Advisor or program advisor, stating their support of the applicant’s attendance at the conference.

Read about the travel award.

Funding support for GA Travel Awards is provided as part of the Peet’s Coffee for a Cause Program. A portion of every Peet’s Coffee purchase made at Cal Dining Peet’s locations helps support student programs and initiatives including graduate travel grants, student scholarships, campus sustainability programs, a basic needs skills course, and an on-campus farm and gardening program. Visit the Peet’s partner page to learn more.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Research

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Teaching

GSI Teaching Gallery 

This video series showcases examples of several common GSI activities. Some frequent kinds of classroom interactions can be difficult to visualize for instructors unfamiliar with running a section or lab but these four highly effective Berkeley GSIs generously allowed us to record a class period. Most of the videos are from one to three minutes long.

Visit the GSI Teaching Gallery.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Teaching Guide for GSIs 

The Teaching Guide is meant to give UC Berkeley GSIs well informed guidance as they begin teaching and throughout their GSI appointments as they continue to hone their skills. Most of the material was researched and developed by current and former GSIs at Berkeley, so it’s contextualized to our teaching situations, our students, and the resources the campus makes available to us.

Visit the Teaching Guide for GSIs.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

How Students Learn: Talks by UC Berkeley Faculty Researchers 

Structuring class activities and assignments that best help students learn is a difficult art to master, so GSIs do well to become informed about the practices that are most effective for student learning and what makes them effective.

On the GSI Center website, you will find links to a variety of resources that explain research on learning, which GSIs can reflect on and apply to their teaching.

Visit the How Students Learn section of the GSI Center website for more information.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

GSI Professional Standards and Ethics Online Course 

Through this course GSIs learn about policies, practices, and standards that all instructors need to know in order to perform their responsibilities professionally and ethically. The course is structured in five modules:

  • Promoting Learning through Diversity: The Inclusive Classroom
  • Teaching Students with Disabilities
  • Creating an Educational Environment Free of Sexual Harassment
  • Fostering Academic Integrity
  • GSI Responsibilities and Ethics

The goal of this online course is to enable GSIs to carry out their responsibilities in a manner that promotes student learning and their own growth as instructors while upholding the professional standards and expectations of the University. Along with the seminar on teaching and learning in higher education that GSIs take in their departments, the Teaching Conference, and the mentoring GSIs receive from the faculty member whom they teach with, this online course  provides GSIs with an excellent foundation as they begin to teach at Berkeley.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Workshops on Teaching for GSIs 

Offered each semester, the GSI Center’s Workshops on Teaching for GSIs cover a wide variety of topics related to university teaching and the GSI experience in 80 minutes. The purpose of the series is to offer GSIs, and other graduate students interested in teaching, opportunities for hands-on learning and practical discussion about pedagogy.

Notes and handouts from selected workshops are available online.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 

As a national leader in preparing graduate students for teaching, UC Berkeley is one of the few universities in the country that have a comprehensive policy on GSI mentoring. The development activities that Berkeley GSIs undertake to fulfill the requirements of this policy—the Teaching Conference, the Online Ethics Course, and the 300-level pedagogy course in their disciplines—support GSIs in their teaching at UC Berkeley, but they also help form the foundation of their teaching and leadership skills in future academic and non-academic careers. The UC Berkeley Certificate Program in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education adds to these three basic requirements participation in workshops on teaching, teaching observation, creation of a teaching portfolio, and several other development activities.

For details, please see the Certificate Program Requirements.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Award-Winning GSI Teaching Ideas 

Over 200 essays written by recipients of the Teaching Effectiveness Award (TEA), a very competitive award given each year by the Graduate Council’s Faculty Advisory Committee for GSI Affairs. Each essay identifies a problem the GSI encountered in teaching, explains the GSI’s strategy and rationale in devising a solution, and assesses the effectiveness of the solution.

Visit the Teaching Effectiveness Award section of the GSI Center website.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Professionalism

Humanists@Work 

Humanists@Work is a UC-wide initiative geared towards UC Humanities and humanistic Social Science MAs and PhDs interested in careers outside/alongside the academy.

Humanists@Work is a targeted continuation of the Mellon-funded Humanities and Changing Conceptions of Work. This initiative, which sought to examine the changing conceptions and experiences of work in the face of major economic, technological and social developments, supported multi-campus research projects, individual scholars, and a daylong workshop geared to humanities graduate students. It was out of this workshop that Humanists@Work was born.

In partnership with the Modern Language Association’s “Connected Academics: Preparing Doctoral Students of Language and Literature for a Variety of Careers” project, UCHRI’s Humanists@Work project will conduct six workshops over the next three years and work closely with language and literature departments across the University of California system to ensure that their graduate students will attend and benefit from the training and engagement and that departments will take the lead in tracking the career prospects and job placements of their respective graduates. In addition to the statewide workshops, UCHRI will create a graduate student advisory committee to assist in planning the workshops and creating content for the website.


MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


CHEM295: Special Topics in Career Development 

A pilot course offered in the College of Chemistry open to all graduate students.

 

This course navigates all aspects of the path to career from the beginning stages of the Individual Development Plan (IDP) in grad school to negotiating your starting salary.


Ph.D. Career Counseling 

The Career Center offers the opportunity to meet with a Ph.D. counselor to discuss the academic job search and the widening range of career options for Ph.D.s. If you have any questions about the academic job search process or are unsure about what other possibilities you’d like to explore, feel free to make an appointment with one of the Career Center’s Ph.D. counselors:

Andrew Green (Ph.D., Political Science, UC Berkeley ’93) taught for six years at Connecticut College before joining the staff of the Career Center on April Fool’s Day, 1997.

Debra Behrens (Ph.D., Education, UC Santa Barbara) taught at California State University before joining the Career Center.

Provided by: Career Center  

Job Search Services 

The Career Center offers a variety of job search services, including CareerMail, a letter of recommendation compiling service, a database of job listings and on-campus recruiting events, and a resume book.

If you want to receive timely updates and information about opportunities and events designed specifically for graduate students and Ph.D.s, sign up for CareerMail. To do so, register or login to Callisto and on your profile select one of the two Ph.D. specific options (Ph.D.s in the Sciences/Eng or Ph.D.s in Hum/Soc Sci). You may also sign up for one or more of the industry-oriented lists (e.g., business, Environmental, or Sciences Biological & Physical).

Letter Service compiles and sends out letters of recommendation files.

Callisto provides online listings of part-time, full-time and temporary jobs exclusively for Cal undergraduate and graduate students. Upon graduation, Ph.D.s can maintain access by purchasing an Alumni Advantage membership. Over 500 employers annually conduct 15,000 interviews on-campus for full-time and summer positions through this web-based recruiting system. Graduate students and Ph.D. Alumni members are eligible and there is no longer a recruiting fee for this service.

Resume books are a job search tool that enables you to circulate your resume to potential employers. By including your resume in one or more of 14 books, you are allowing interested employers to view your resume and contact you directly about job openings and their recruitment activities.

Provided by: Career Center  

Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty 

Offered jointly by the Graduate Writing Center (formerly Academic Services) and the GSI Teaching & Resource Center, the aim of the Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty is to enable graduate students to excel in all aspects of academic life as they pursue an advanced degree at Berkeley and transition from graduate school to future academic careers. The Institute takes place at the end of the Spring semester. Graduate students who are nearing completion of their graduate programs and beginning to prepare for the academic job market are encouraged to apply. For more information or if you have questions about the Summer Institute, please see the Graduate Division’s GSI Teaching and Resource Center website, email gsi@berkeley.edu, or call (510) 642-4456.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center   Graduate Writing Center  

Individual Development Plan (IDP) 

At UC Berkeley the Individual Development Plan (IDP) is defined as a private, dynamic, annual self-evaluation and career exploration tool for graduate students and postdocs. It is a written list of goals mapped to a timeline and includes goal setting for research projects, skills development, and career planning.

The IDP is to be written and developed by the trainee, and can serve as a framework for discussion between faculty mentor and trainee. The IDP is most meaningful if trainees (with support from their mentors) make full use of the IDP’s potential as a research agenda and career development tool, and update it annually to reflect accomplishments and changes in career and research objectives.

Learn more about Individual Development Planning.

Provided by: Visiting Scholar and Postdoc Affairs (VSPA) Program   Career Center  

Leadership

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) 

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) is a collaborative partnership between the Office of Graduate Diversity and the Graduate Assembly (GA). Its goal is to prepare undergraduate UC Berkeley students to select, apply to, and enroll in graduate school. By working with key staff and graduate student mentors, motivated undergraduates are inspired to pursue academic careers as they acquire a better understanding of how to succeed in the graduate school application process.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly   Office for Graduate Diversity  

MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


Graduate Assembly Delegates and Projects 

At UC Berkeley, every student has the power to actively engage with and change the world around them. Don’t just passively experience change in our world – help make change!

Become a Delegate and join students from across campus once a month to discuss campus and graduate student matters, direct your student leadership to action, and vote on important campus issues. Delegates represent their department or graduate student groups as voting member of the Graduate Assembly governing body and sit on influential campus-wide committees. If you are interested in joining the Delegate Assembly, contact the Internal Vice President at internal@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Delegates page.

The GA’s nine sponsored Projects are responsible for creating graduate-centered programming for a wide variety of campus communities. GA Project Directors and their volunteers host conferences, social and networking events, roundtables, and other events by and for graduate students. To get involved with a Project, email the Campus Affairs Vice President at cavp@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Projects page.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) 

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) is a program offered by the GSI Teaching & Resource Center and the Graduate Writing Center that enables doctoral students to create mentored research opportunities for undergraduate students at UC Berkeley. The program provides summer funding for both graduate and undergraduate participants and opportunities to share research results on campus and at national conferences.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center   GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

The Berkeley Graduate 

The Berkeley Graduate, the Graduate Assembly-sponsored publication, is always looking for guest columnists. They welcome columns from Berkeley graduate and professional students on a wide variety of topics related to student life, research, and involvement in the wider community. Columns may range from how to survive and thrive as a graduate or professional student to the latest research in your department. They especially encourage topics that document or facilitate interaction and understanding across departments.

The goal of The Berkeley Graduate is to inform and inspire graduate students by connecting them to a campus-wide community online. By tapping into the collective knowledge of this body of students, they hope students learn from each other how to make the most of their time as Berkeley students; to highlight exciting, interdisciplinary, or collaborative research at Berkeley; and to encourage participation in the broader community through outreach and volunteer work.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Berkeley Connect 

Undergraduates at Berkeley increasingly wish for a more intimate and supportive academic experience, one in which they can be part of an intellectual community comprising faculty, graduate students, their fellow undergraduates, and alumni/ae. Berkeley Connect provides just such an experience by placing participants in small discussion groups assigned to a graduate mentor, who is responsible for group meetings and one-on-one advising. In addition, the program includes informal lectures by professors, visits to Berkeley resources, panel discussions of career opportunities and graduate school, and social events in which professors, graduate students, and undergraduates can talk informally about intellectual issues.

Provided by: Berkeley Connect  

Advanced Knowledge

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

BIDS Video Archive 

The Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS) provides a collection of recorded lectures that cover a wide range of topics, tools, programming languages, and methods of analysis of interest to budding graduate student data scientists.

Provided by: Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS)  

Empirical Research Methods Workshops 

In 2007 the Center for the Study of Law and Society (CSLS) launched the CSLS Empirical Research Methods Workshop series. The series introduces Berkeley Law faculty, CSLS affiliated faculty & visiting scholars, and graduate students interested in conducting empirical research on law to a wide range of empirical methods, both quantitative and qualitative. Workshops are led by leading experts on particular methodologies. All workshops are recorded and posted on the CSLS website, along with any necessary workshop materials.

Past topics include:

  • Criminal Justice Data Analysis
  • Using Video Records to Analyze Interactions
  • Ethnography of the Global
  • Survey Research in an Era of Diversity, Polarization, and Technological Change
  • Connecting Qualitative and Quantitative Methods
  • Social Network Analysis in Sociolegal Research
Provided by: Center for the Study of Law and Society  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Communication

Conference Travel Grants 

Academic master’s and all doctoral students may apply for Conference Travel Grant funding to attend professional conferences or to participate in professional development activities; however, students in professional degrees and self-sustaining programs are not eligible. For professional conferences, grant amounts will depend on the location of the conference (up to $600 within California, $900 elsewhere in North America, including Canada and Mexico, and $1,500 outside of North America). The amounts provided for professional development support will vary depending on the actual costs, but in no case will a grant exceed $1,500. Master’s students are eligible for only one travel grant per academic career. Doctoral students are eligible for two grants per academic career, regardless of how many degrees they earn. To be eligible to apply, applicants must:

  1. Be registered for the term in which they are planning to attend the conference, which also includes payment of fees/tuitions. Note: students on filing fee are not eligible.
  2. Be in good academic standing.
  3. Be presenting a paper or poster at the conference.

Please note that grant requests to support travel to professional conferences must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor; grant requests to support professional development activities may be approved by the student’s faculty advisor or the Associate Dean for the Graduate Division. Approvals are obtained through the Slate application portal.

Provided by: Graduate Fellowships Office  

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

GSPDP 320: Academic Writing for Graduate Students 

This course provides graduate students with formal instruction in the genres and mechanics of academic writing at the graduate and professorial level. Through presentations, readings, discussion, and weekly peer editing, graduate students will develop writing and editing skills necessary for their success as graduate students and future faculty.

Course Goals

  • to familiarize graduate students with the different genres of academic writing (e.g., seminar papers, journal articles, books, grant proposals, dissertation prospecti, etc.) and how these genres vary from discipline to discipline;
  • to help graduate students become better writers by analyzing writing on both the micro (sentence) and macro (organizational) levels;
  • to teach graduate students basic skills of professional editing so that they can become better editors of their own work and that of peers;
  • to enable graduate students to apply these skills to a piece of their own writing and to the writing of peers.
Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Graduate Assembly Travel Award 

The Graduate Assembly recognizes that a graduate student’s education requires presenting at conferences and/or seminars, some of which take place in locations outside the Bay Area. Since these conference locations are out of the area, some departments may not provide full financial assistance. As a result, the GA implemented the Travel Award to assist with travel expenses associated with presenting at conferences.

The Travel Award provides funding to graduate students presenting at conferences taking place outside of the San Francisco Bay Area. These conferences must benefit the student’s educational or research endeavors. To be eligible for the Travel Award, the student must be presenting at the conference. The application includes a section to be completed by the student’s Academic Advisor or program advisor, stating their support of the applicant’s attendance at the conference.

Read about the travel award.

Funding support for GA Travel Awards is provided as part of the Peet’s Coffee for a Cause Program. A portion of every Peet’s Coffee purchase made at Cal Dining Peet’s locations helps support student programs and initiatives including graduate travel grants, student scholarships, campus sustainability programs, a basic needs skills course, and an on-campus farm and gardening program. Visit the Peet’s partner page to learn more.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Research

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Teaching

GSI Teaching Gallery 

This video series showcases examples of several common GSI activities. Some frequent kinds of classroom interactions can be difficult to visualize for instructors unfamiliar with running a section or lab but these four highly effective Berkeley GSIs generously allowed us to record a class period. Most of the videos are from one to three minutes long.

Visit the GSI Teaching Gallery.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Teaching Guide for GSIs 

The Teaching Guide is meant to give UC Berkeley GSIs well informed guidance as they begin teaching and throughout their GSI appointments as they continue to hone their skills. Most of the material was researched and developed by current and former GSIs at Berkeley, so it’s contextualized to our teaching situations, our students, and the resources the campus makes available to us.

Visit the Teaching Guide for GSIs.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

How Students Learn: Talks by UC Berkeley Faculty Researchers 

Structuring class activities and assignments that best help students learn is a difficult art to master, so GSIs do well to become informed about the practices that are most effective for student learning and what makes them effective.

On the GSI Center website, you will find links to a variety of resources that explain research on learning, which GSIs can reflect on and apply to their teaching.

Visit the How Students Learn section of the GSI Center website for more information.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

GSI Professional Standards and Ethics Online Course 

Through this course GSIs learn about policies, practices, and standards that all instructors need to know in order to perform their responsibilities professionally and ethically. The course is structured in five modules:

  • Promoting Learning through Diversity: The Inclusive Classroom
  • Teaching Students with Disabilities
  • Creating an Educational Environment Free of Sexual Harassment
  • Fostering Academic Integrity
  • GSI Responsibilities and Ethics

The goal of this online course is to enable GSIs to carry out their responsibilities in a manner that promotes student learning and their own growth as instructors while upholding the professional standards and expectations of the University. Along with the seminar on teaching and learning in higher education that GSIs take in their departments, the Teaching Conference, and the mentoring GSIs receive from the faculty member whom they teach with, this online course  provides GSIs with an excellent foundation as they begin to teach at Berkeley.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Workshops on Teaching for GSIs 

Offered each semester, the GSI Center’s Workshops on Teaching for GSIs cover a wide variety of topics related to university teaching and the GSI experience in 80 minutes. The purpose of the series is to offer GSIs, and other graduate students interested in teaching, opportunities for hands-on learning and practical discussion about pedagogy.

Notes and handouts from selected workshops are available online.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 

As a national leader in preparing graduate students for teaching, UC Berkeley is one of the few universities in the country that have a comprehensive policy on GSI mentoring. The development activities that Berkeley GSIs undertake to fulfill the requirements of this policy—the Teaching Conference, the Online Ethics Course, and the 300-level pedagogy course in their disciplines—support GSIs in their teaching at UC Berkeley, but they also help form the foundation of their teaching and leadership skills in future academic and non-academic careers. The UC Berkeley Certificate Program in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education adds to these three basic requirements participation in workshops on teaching, teaching observation, creation of a teaching portfolio, and several other development activities.

For details, please see the Certificate Program Requirements.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Award-Winning GSI Teaching Ideas 

Over 200 essays written by recipients of the Teaching Effectiveness Award (TEA), a very competitive award given each year by the Graduate Council’s Faculty Advisory Committee for GSI Affairs. Each essay identifies a problem the GSI encountered in teaching, explains the GSI’s strategy and rationale in devising a solution, and assesses the effectiveness of the solution.

Visit the Teaching Effectiveness Award section of the GSI Center website.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Professionalism

Humanists@Work 

Humanists@Work is a UC-wide initiative geared towards UC Humanities and humanistic Social Science MAs and PhDs interested in careers outside/alongside the academy.

Humanists@Work is a targeted continuation of the Mellon-funded Humanities and Changing Conceptions of Work. This initiative, which sought to examine the changing conceptions and experiences of work in the face of major economic, technological and social developments, supported multi-campus research projects, individual scholars, and a daylong workshop geared to humanities graduate students. It was out of this workshop that Humanists@Work was born.

In partnership with the Modern Language Association’s “Connected Academics: Preparing Doctoral Students of Language and Literature for a Variety of Careers” project, UCHRI’s Humanists@Work project will conduct six workshops over the next three years and work closely with language and literature departments across the University of California system to ensure that their graduate students will attend and benefit from the training and engagement and that departments will take the lead in tracking the career prospects and job placements of their respective graduates. In addition to the statewide workshops, UCHRI will create a graduate student advisory committee to assist in planning the workshops and creating content for the website.


MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


CHEM295: Special Topics in Career Development 

A pilot course offered in the College of Chemistry open to all graduate students.

 

This course navigates all aspects of the path to career from the beginning stages of the Individual Development Plan (IDP) in grad school to negotiating your starting salary.


Ph.D. Career Counseling 

The Career Center offers the opportunity to meet with a Ph.D. counselor to discuss the academic job search and the widening range of career options for Ph.D.s. If you have any questions about the academic job search process or are unsure about what other possibilities you’d like to explore, feel free to make an appointment with one of the Career Center’s Ph.D. counselors:

Andrew Green (Ph.D., Political Science, UC Berkeley ’93) taught for six years at Connecticut College before joining the staff of the Career Center on April Fool’s Day, 1997.

Debra Behrens (Ph.D., Education, UC Santa Barbara) taught at California State University before joining the Career Center.

Provided by: Career Center  

Job Search Services 

The Career Center offers a variety of job search services, including CareerMail, a letter of recommendation compiling service, a database of job listings and on-campus recruiting events, and a resume book.

If you want to receive timely updates and information about opportunities and events designed specifically for graduate students and Ph.D.s, sign up for CareerMail. To do so, register or login to Callisto and on your profile select one of the two Ph.D. specific options (Ph.D.s in the Sciences/Eng or Ph.D.s in Hum/Soc Sci). You may also sign up for one or more of the industry-oriented lists (e.g., business, Environmental, or Sciences Biological & Physical).

Letter Service compiles and sends out letters of recommendation files.

Callisto provides online listings of part-time, full-time and temporary jobs exclusively for Cal undergraduate and graduate students. Upon graduation, Ph.D.s can maintain access by purchasing an Alumni Advantage membership. Over 500 employers annually conduct 15,000 interviews on-campus for full-time and summer positions through this web-based recruiting system. Graduate students and Ph.D. Alumni members are eligible and there is no longer a recruiting fee for this service.

Resume books are a job search tool that enables you to circulate your resume to potential employers. By including your resume in one or more of 14 books, you are allowing interested employers to view your resume and contact you directly about job openings and their recruitment activities.

Provided by: Career Center  

Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty 

Offered jointly by the Graduate Writing Center (formerly Academic Services) and the GSI Teaching & Resource Center, the aim of the Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty is to enable graduate students to excel in all aspects of academic life as they pursue an advanced degree at Berkeley and transition from graduate school to future academic careers. The Institute takes place at the end of the Spring semester. Graduate students who are nearing completion of their graduate programs and beginning to prepare for the academic job market are encouraged to apply. For more information or if you have questions about the Summer Institute, please see the Graduate Division’s GSI Teaching and Resource Center website, email gsi@berkeley.edu, or call (510) 642-4456.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center   Graduate Writing Center  

Individual Development Plan (IDP) 

At UC Berkeley the Individual Development Plan (IDP) is defined as a private, dynamic, annual self-evaluation and career exploration tool for graduate students and postdocs. It is a written list of goals mapped to a timeline and includes goal setting for research projects, skills development, and career planning.

The IDP is to be written and developed by the trainee, and can serve as a framework for discussion between faculty mentor and trainee. The IDP is most meaningful if trainees (with support from their mentors) make full use of the IDP’s potential as a research agenda and career development tool, and update it annually to reflect accomplishments and changes in career and research objectives.

Learn more about Individual Development Planning.

Provided by: Visiting Scholar and Postdoc Affairs (VSPA) Program   Career Center  

Leadership

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) 

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) is a collaborative partnership between the Office of Graduate Diversity and the Graduate Assembly (GA). Its goal is to prepare undergraduate UC Berkeley students to select, apply to, and enroll in graduate school. By working with key staff and graduate student mentors, motivated undergraduates are inspired to pursue academic careers as they acquire a better understanding of how to succeed in the graduate school application process.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly   Office for Graduate Diversity  

MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


Graduate Assembly Delegates and Projects 

At UC Berkeley, every student has the power to actively engage with and change the world around them. Don’t just passively experience change in our world – help make change!

Become a Delegate and join students from across campus once a month to discuss campus and graduate student matters, direct your student leadership to action, and vote on important campus issues. Delegates represent their department or graduate student groups as voting member of the Graduate Assembly governing body and sit on influential campus-wide committees. If you are interested in joining the Delegate Assembly, contact the Internal Vice President at internal@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Delegates page.

The GA’s nine sponsored Projects are responsible for creating graduate-centered programming for a wide variety of campus communities. GA Project Directors and their volunteers host conferences, social and networking events, roundtables, and other events by and for graduate students. To get involved with a Project, email the Campus Affairs Vice President at cavp@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Projects page.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) 

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) is a program offered by the GSI Teaching & Resource Center and the Graduate Writing Center that enables doctoral students to create mentored research opportunities for undergraduate students at UC Berkeley. The program provides summer funding for both graduate and undergraduate participants and opportunities to share research results on campus and at national conferences.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center   GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

The Berkeley Graduate 

The Berkeley Graduate, the Graduate Assembly-sponsored publication, is always looking for guest columnists. They welcome columns from Berkeley graduate and professional students on a wide variety of topics related to student life, research, and involvement in the wider community. Columns may range from how to survive and thrive as a graduate or professional student to the latest research in your department. They especially encourage topics that document or facilitate interaction and understanding across departments.

The goal of The Berkeley Graduate is to inform and inspire graduate students by connecting them to a campus-wide community online. By tapping into the collective knowledge of this body of students, they hope students learn from each other how to make the most of their time as Berkeley students; to highlight exciting, interdisciplinary, or collaborative research at Berkeley; and to encourage participation in the broader community through outreach and volunteer work.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Berkeley Connect 

Undergraduates at Berkeley increasingly wish for a more intimate and supportive academic experience, one in which they can be part of an intellectual community comprising faculty, graduate students, their fellow undergraduates, and alumni/ae. Berkeley Connect provides just such an experience by placing participants in small discussion groups assigned to a graduate mentor, who is responsible for group meetings and one-on-one advising. In addition, the program includes informal lectures by professors, visits to Berkeley resources, panel discussions of career opportunities and graduate school, and social events in which professors, graduate students, and undergraduates can talk informally about intellectual issues.

Provided by: Berkeley Connect  

Advanced Knowledge

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

BIDS Video Archive 

The Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS) provides a collection of recorded lectures that cover a wide range of topics, tools, programming languages, and methods of analysis of interest to budding graduate student data scientists.

Provided by: Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS)  

Empirical Research Methods Workshops 

In 2007 the Center for the Study of Law and Society (CSLS) launched the CSLS Empirical Research Methods Workshop series. The series introduces Berkeley Law faculty, CSLS affiliated faculty & visiting scholars, and graduate students interested in conducting empirical research on law to a wide range of empirical methods, both quantitative and qualitative. Workshops are led by leading experts on particular methodologies. All workshops are recorded and posted on the CSLS website, along with any necessary workshop materials.

Past topics include:

  • Criminal Justice Data Analysis
  • Using Video Records to Analyze Interactions
  • Ethnography of the Global
  • Survey Research in an Era of Diversity, Polarization, and Technological Change
  • Connecting Qualitative and Quantitative Methods
  • Social Network Analysis in Sociolegal Research
Provided by: Center for the Study of Law and Society  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Communication

Conference Travel Grants 

Academic master’s and all doctoral students may apply for Conference Travel Grant funding to attend professional conferences or to participate in professional development activities; however, students in professional degrees and self-sustaining programs are not eligible. For professional conferences, grant amounts will depend on the location of the conference (up to $600 within California, $900 elsewhere in North America, including Canada and Mexico, and $1,500 outside of North America). The amounts provided for professional development support will vary depending on the actual costs, but in no case will a grant exceed $1,500. Master’s students are eligible for only one travel grant per academic career. Doctoral students are eligible for two grants per academic career, regardless of how many degrees they earn. To be eligible to apply, applicants must:

  1. Be registered for the term in which they are planning to attend the conference, which also includes payment of fees/tuitions. Note: students on filing fee are not eligible.
  2. Be in good academic standing.
  3. Be presenting a paper or poster at the conference.

Please note that grant requests to support travel to professional conferences must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor; grant requests to support professional development activities may be approved by the student’s faculty advisor or the Associate Dean for the Graduate Division. Approvals are obtained through the Slate application portal.

Provided by: Graduate Fellowships Office  

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

GSPDP 320: Academic Writing for Graduate Students 

This course provides graduate students with formal instruction in the genres and mechanics of academic writing at the graduate and professorial level. Through presentations, readings, discussion, and weekly peer editing, graduate students will develop writing and editing skills necessary for their success as graduate students and future faculty.

Course Goals

  • to familiarize graduate students with the different genres of academic writing (e.g., seminar papers, journal articles, books, grant proposals, dissertation prospecti, etc.) and how these genres vary from discipline to discipline;
  • to help graduate students become better writers by analyzing writing on both the micro (sentence) and macro (organizational) levels;
  • to teach graduate students basic skills of professional editing so that they can become better editors of their own work and that of peers;
  • to enable graduate students to apply these skills to a piece of their own writing and to the writing of peers.
Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Graduate Assembly Travel Award 

The Graduate Assembly recognizes that a graduate student’s education requires presenting at conferences and/or seminars, some of which take place in locations outside the Bay Area. Since these conference locations are out of the area, some departments may not provide full financial assistance. As a result, the GA implemented the Travel Award to assist with travel expenses associated with presenting at conferences.

The Travel Award provides funding to graduate students presenting at conferences taking place outside of the San Francisco Bay Area. These conferences must benefit the student’s educational or research endeavors. To be eligible for the Travel Award, the student must be presenting at the conference. The application includes a section to be completed by the student’s Academic Advisor or program advisor, stating their support of the applicant’s attendance at the conference.

Read about the travel award.

Funding support for GA Travel Awards is provided as part of the Peet’s Coffee for a Cause Program. A portion of every Peet’s Coffee purchase made at Cal Dining Peet’s locations helps support student programs and initiatives including graduate travel grants, student scholarships, campus sustainability programs, a basic needs skills course, and an on-campus farm and gardening program. Visit the Peet’s partner page to learn more.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Research

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Teaching

GSI Teaching Gallery 

This video series showcases examples of several common GSI activities. Some frequent kinds of classroom interactions can be difficult to visualize for instructors unfamiliar with running a section or lab but these four highly effective Berkeley GSIs generously allowed us to record a class period. Most of the videos are from one to three minutes long.

Visit the GSI Teaching Gallery.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Teaching Guide for GSIs 

The Teaching Guide is meant to give UC Berkeley GSIs well informed guidance as they begin teaching and throughout their GSI appointments as they continue to hone their skills. Most of the material was researched and developed by current and former GSIs at Berkeley, so it’s contextualized to our teaching situations, our students, and the resources the campus makes available to us.

Visit the Teaching Guide for GSIs.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

How Students Learn: Talks by UC Berkeley Faculty Researchers 

Structuring class activities and assignments that best help students learn is a difficult art to master, so GSIs do well to become informed about the practices that are most effective for student learning and what makes them effective.

On the GSI Center website, you will find links to a variety of resources that explain research on learning, which GSIs can reflect on and apply to their teaching.

Visit the How Students Learn section of the GSI Center website for more information.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

GSI Professional Standards and Ethics Online Course 

Through this course GSIs learn about policies, practices, and standards that all instructors need to know in order to perform their responsibilities professionally and ethically. The course is structured in five modules:

  • Promoting Learning through Diversity: The Inclusive Classroom
  • Teaching Students with Disabilities
  • Creating an Educational Environment Free of Sexual Harassment
  • Fostering Academic Integrity
  • GSI Responsibilities and Ethics

The goal of this online course is to enable GSIs to carry out their responsibilities in a manner that promotes student learning and their own growth as instructors while upholding the professional standards and expectations of the University. Along with the seminar on teaching and learning in higher education that GSIs take in their departments, the Teaching Conference, and the mentoring GSIs receive from the faculty member whom they teach with, this online course  provides GSIs with an excellent foundation as they begin to teach at Berkeley.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Workshops on Teaching for GSIs 

Offered each semester, the GSI Center’s Workshops on Teaching for GSIs cover a wide variety of topics related to university teaching and the GSI experience in 80 minutes. The purpose of the series is to offer GSIs, and other graduate students interested in teaching, opportunities for hands-on learning and practical discussion about pedagogy.

Notes and handouts from selected workshops are available online.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 

As a national leader in preparing graduate students for teaching, UC Berkeley is one of the few universities in the country that have a comprehensive policy on GSI mentoring. The development activities that Berkeley GSIs undertake to fulfill the requirements of this policy—the Teaching Conference, the Online Ethics Course, and the 300-level pedagogy course in their disciplines—support GSIs in their teaching at UC Berkeley, but they also help form the foundation of their teaching and leadership skills in future academic and non-academic careers. The UC Berkeley Certificate Program in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education adds to these three basic requirements participation in workshops on teaching, teaching observation, creation of a teaching portfolio, and several other development activities.

For details, please see the Certificate Program Requirements.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Award-Winning GSI Teaching Ideas 

Over 200 essays written by recipients of the Teaching Effectiveness Award (TEA), a very competitive award given each year by the Graduate Council’s Faculty Advisory Committee for GSI Affairs. Each essay identifies a problem the GSI encountered in teaching, explains the GSI’s strategy and rationale in devising a solution, and assesses the effectiveness of the solution.

Visit the Teaching Effectiveness Award section of the GSI Center website.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Professionalism

Humanists@Work 

Humanists@Work is a UC-wide initiative geared towards UC Humanities and humanistic Social Science MAs and PhDs interested in careers outside/alongside the academy.

Humanists@Work is a targeted continuation of the Mellon-funded Humanities and Changing Conceptions of Work. This initiative, which sought to examine the changing conceptions and experiences of work in the face of major economic, technological and social developments, supported multi-campus research projects, individual scholars, and a daylong workshop geared to humanities graduate students. It was out of this workshop that Humanists@Work was born.

In partnership with the Modern Language Association’s “Connected Academics: Preparing Doctoral Students of Language and Literature for a Variety of Careers” project, UCHRI’s Humanists@Work project will conduct six workshops over the next three years and work closely with language and literature departments across the University of California system to ensure that their graduate students will attend and benefit from the training and engagement and that departments will take the lead in tracking the career prospects and job placements of their respective graduates. In addition to the statewide workshops, UCHRI will create a graduate student advisory committee to assist in planning the workshops and creating content for the website.


MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


CHEM295: Special Topics in Career Development 

A pilot course offered in the College of Chemistry open to all graduate students.

 

This course navigates all aspects of the path to career from the beginning stages of the Individual Development Plan (IDP) in grad school to negotiating your starting salary.


Ph.D. Career Counseling 

The Career Center offers the opportunity to meet with a Ph.D. counselor to discuss the academic job search and the widening range of career options for Ph.D.s. If you have any questions about the academic job search process or are unsure about what other possibilities you’d like to explore, feel free to make an appointment with one of the Career Center’s Ph.D. counselors:

Andrew Green (Ph.D., Political Science, UC Berkeley ’93) taught for six years at Connecticut College before joining the staff of the Career Center on April Fool’s Day, 1997.

Debra Behrens (Ph.D., Education, UC Santa Barbara) taught at California State University before joining the Career Center.

Provided by: Career Center  

Job Search Services 

The Career Center offers a variety of job search services, including CareerMail, a letter of recommendation compiling service, a database of job listings and on-campus recruiting events, and a resume book.

If you want to receive timely updates and information about opportunities and events designed specifically for graduate students and Ph.D.s, sign up for CareerMail. To do so, register or login to Callisto and on your profile select one of the two Ph.D. specific options (Ph.D.s in the Sciences/Eng or Ph.D.s in Hum/Soc Sci). You may also sign up for one or more of the industry-oriented lists (e.g., business, Environmental, or Sciences Biological & Physical).

Letter Service compiles and sends out letters of recommendation files.

Callisto provides online listings of part-time, full-time and temporary jobs exclusively for Cal undergraduate and graduate students. Upon graduation, Ph.D.s can maintain access by purchasing an Alumni Advantage membership. Over 500 employers annually conduct 15,000 interviews on-campus for full-time and summer positions through this web-based recruiting system. Graduate students and Ph.D. Alumni members are eligible and there is no longer a recruiting fee for this service.

Resume books are a job search tool that enables you to circulate your resume to potential employers. By including your resume in one or more of 14 books, you are allowing interested employers to view your resume and contact you directly about job openings and their recruitment activities.

Provided by: Career Center  

Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty 

Offered jointly by the Graduate Writing Center (formerly Academic Services) and the GSI Teaching & Resource Center, the aim of the Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty is to enable graduate students to excel in all aspects of academic life as they pursue an advanced degree at Berkeley and transition from graduate school to future academic careers. The Institute takes place at the end of the Spring semester. Graduate students who are nearing completion of their graduate programs and beginning to prepare for the academic job market are encouraged to apply. For more information or if you have questions about the Summer Institute, please see the Graduate Division’s GSI Teaching and Resource Center website, email gsi@berkeley.edu, or call (510) 642-4456.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center   Graduate Writing Center  

Individual Development Plan (IDP) 

At UC Berkeley the Individual Development Plan (IDP) is defined as a private, dynamic, annual self-evaluation and career exploration tool for graduate students and postdocs. It is a written list of goals mapped to a timeline and includes goal setting for research projects, skills development, and career planning.

The IDP is to be written and developed by the trainee, and can serve as a framework for discussion between faculty mentor and trainee. The IDP is most meaningful if trainees (with support from their mentors) make full use of the IDP’s potential as a research agenda and career development tool, and update it annually to reflect accomplishments and changes in career and research objectives.

Learn more about Individual Development Planning.

Provided by: Visiting Scholar and Postdoc Affairs (VSPA) Program   Career Center  

Leadership

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) 

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) is a collaborative partnership between the Office of Graduate Diversity and the Graduate Assembly (GA). Its goal is to prepare undergraduate UC Berkeley students to select, apply to, and enroll in graduate school. By working with key staff and graduate student mentors, motivated undergraduates are inspired to pursue academic careers as they acquire a better understanding of how to succeed in the graduate school application process.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly   Office for Graduate Diversity  

MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


Graduate Assembly Delegates and Projects 

At UC Berkeley, every student has the power to actively engage with and change the world around them. Don’t just passively experience change in our world – help make change!

Become a Delegate and join students from across campus once a month to discuss campus and graduate student matters, direct your student leadership to action, and vote on important campus issues. Delegates represent their department or graduate student groups as voting member of the Graduate Assembly governing body and sit on influential campus-wide committees. If you are interested in joining the Delegate Assembly, contact the Internal Vice President at internal@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Delegates page.

The GA’s nine sponsored Projects are responsible for creating graduate-centered programming for a wide variety of campus communities. GA Project Directors and their volunteers host conferences, social and networking events, roundtables, and other events by and for graduate students. To get involved with a Project, email the Campus Affairs Vice President at cavp@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Projects page.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) 

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) is a program offered by the GSI Teaching & Resource Center and the Graduate Writing Center that enables doctoral students to create mentored research opportunities for undergraduate students at UC Berkeley. The program provides summer funding for both graduate and undergraduate participants and opportunities to share research results on campus and at national conferences.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center   GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

The Berkeley Graduate 

The Berkeley Graduate, the Graduate Assembly-sponsored publication, is always looking for guest columnists. They welcome columns from Berkeley graduate and professional students on a wide variety of topics related to student life, research, and involvement in the wider community. Columns may range from how to survive and thrive as a graduate or professional student to the latest research in your department. They especially encourage topics that document or facilitate interaction and understanding across departments.

The goal of The Berkeley Graduate is to inform and inspire graduate students by connecting them to a campus-wide community online. By tapping into the collective knowledge of this body of students, they hope students learn from each other how to make the most of their time as Berkeley students; to highlight exciting, interdisciplinary, or collaborative research at Berkeley; and to encourage participation in the broader community through outreach and volunteer work.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Berkeley Connect 

Undergraduates at Berkeley increasingly wish for a more intimate and supportive academic experience, one in which they can be part of an intellectual community comprising faculty, graduate students, their fellow undergraduates, and alumni/ae. Berkeley Connect provides just such an experience by placing participants in small discussion groups assigned to a graduate mentor, who is responsible for group meetings and one-on-one advising. In addition, the program includes informal lectures by professors, visits to Berkeley resources, panel discussions of career opportunities and graduate school, and social events in which professors, graduate students, and undergraduates can talk informally about intellectual issues.

Provided by: Berkeley Connect  

Advanced Knowledge

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

BIDS Video Archive 

The Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS) provides a collection of recorded lectures that cover a wide range of topics, tools, programming languages, and methods of analysis of interest to budding graduate student data scientists.

Provided by: Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS)  

Empirical Research Methods Workshops 

In 2007 the Center for the Study of Law and Society (CSLS) launched the CSLS Empirical Research Methods Workshop series. The series introduces Berkeley Law faculty, CSLS affiliated faculty & visiting scholars, and graduate students interested in conducting empirical research on law to a wide range of empirical methods, both quantitative and qualitative. Workshops are led by leading experts on particular methodologies. All workshops are recorded and posted on the CSLS website, along with any necessary workshop materials.

Past topics include:

  • Criminal Justice Data Analysis
  • Using Video Records to Analyze Interactions
  • Ethnography of the Global
  • Survey Research in an Era of Diversity, Polarization, and Technological Change
  • Connecting Qualitative and Quantitative Methods
  • Social Network Analysis in Sociolegal Research
Provided by: Center for the Study of Law and Society  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Communication

Conference Travel Grants 

Academic master’s and all doctoral students may apply for Conference Travel Grant funding to attend professional conferences or to participate in professional development activities; however, students in professional degrees and self-sustaining programs are not eligible. For professional conferences, grant amounts will depend on the location of the conference (up to $600 within California, $900 elsewhere in North America, including Canada and Mexico, and $1,500 outside of North America). The amounts provided for professional development support will vary depending on the actual costs, but in no case will a grant exceed $1,500. Master’s students are eligible for only one travel grant per academic career. Doctoral students are eligible for two grants per academic career, regardless of how many degrees they earn. To be eligible to apply, applicants must:

  1. Be registered for the term in which they are planning to attend the conference, which also includes payment of fees/tuitions. Note: students on filing fee are not eligible.
  2. Be in good academic standing.
  3. Be presenting a paper or poster at the conference.

Please note that grant requests to support travel to professional conferences must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor; grant requests to support professional development activities may be approved by the student’s faculty advisor or the Associate Dean for the Graduate Division. Approvals are obtained through the Slate application portal.

Provided by: Graduate Fellowships Office  

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

GSPDP 320: Academic Writing for Graduate Students 

This course provides graduate students with formal instruction in the genres and mechanics of academic writing at the graduate and professorial level. Through presentations, readings, discussion, and weekly peer editing, graduate students will develop writing and editing skills necessary for their success as graduate students and future faculty.

Course Goals

  • to familiarize graduate students with the different genres of academic writing (e.g., seminar papers, journal articles, books, grant proposals, dissertation prospecti, etc.) and how these genres vary from discipline to discipline;
  • to help graduate students become better writers by analyzing writing on both the micro (sentence) and macro (organizational) levels;
  • to teach graduate students basic skills of professional editing so that they can become better editors of their own work and that of peers;
  • to enable graduate students to apply these skills to a piece of their own writing and to the writing of peers.
Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Graduate Assembly Travel Award 

The Graduate Assembly recognizes that a graduate student’s education requires presenting at conferences and/or seminars, some of which take place in locations outside the Bay Area. Since these conference locations are out of the area, some departments may not provide full financial assistance. As a result, the GA implemented the Travel Award to assist with travel expenses associated with presenting at conferences.

The Travel Award provides funding to graduate students presenting at conferences taking place outside of the San Francisco Bay Area. These conferences must benefit the student’s educational or research endeavors. To be eligible for the Travel Award, the student must be presenting at the conference. The application includes a section to be completed by the student’s Academic Advisor or program advisor, stating their support of the applicant’s attendance at the conference.

Read about the travel award.

Funding support for GA Travel Awards is provided as part of the Peet’s Coffee for a Cause Program. A portion of every Peet’s Coffee purchase made at Cal Dining Peet’s locations helps support student programs and initiatives including graduate travel grants, student scholarships, campus sustainability programs, a basic needs skills course, and an on-campus farm and gardening program. Visit the Peet’s partner page to learn more.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Research

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Teaching

GSI Teaching Gallery 

This video series showcases examples of several common GSI activities. Some frequent kinds of classroom interactions can be difficult to visualize for instructors unfamiliar with running a section or lab but these four highly effective Berkeley GSIs generously allowed us to record a class period. Most of the videos are from one to three minutes long.

Visit the GSI Teaching Gallery.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Teaching Guide for GSIs 

The Teaching Guide is meant to give UC Berkeley GSIs well informed guidance as they begin teaching and throughout their GSI appointments as they continue to hone their skills. Most of the material was researched and developed by current and former GSIs at Berkeley, so it’s contextualized to our teaching situations, our students, and the resources the campus makes available to us.

Visit the Teaching Guide for GSIs.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

How Students Learn: Talks by UC Berkeley Faculty Researchers 

Structuring class activities and assignments that best help students learn is a difficult art to master, so GSIs do well to become informed about the practices that are most effective for student learning and what makes them effective.

On the GSI Center website, you will find links to a variety of resources that explain research on learning, which GSIs can reflect on and apply to their teaching.

Visit the How Students Learn section of the GSI Center website for more information.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

GSI Professional Standards and Ethics Online Course 

Through this course GSIs learn about policies, practices, and standards that all instructors need to know in order to perform their responsibilities professionally and ethically. The course is structured in five modules:

  • Promoting Learning through Diversity: The Inclusive Classroom
  • Teaching Students with Disabilities
  • Creating an Educational Environment Free of Sexual Harassment
  • Fostering Academic Integrity
  • GSI Responsibilities and Ethics

The goal of this online course is to enable GSIs to carry out their responsibilities in a manner that promotes student learning and their own growth as instructors while upholding the professional standards and expectations of the University. Along with the seminar on teaching and learning in higher education that GSIs take in their departments, the Teaching Conference, and the mentoring GSIs receive from the faculty member whom they teach with, this online course  provides GSIs with an excellent foundation as they begin to teach at Berkeley.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Workshops on Teaching for GSIs 

Offered each semester, the GSI Center’s Workshops on Teaching for GSIs cover a wide variety of topics related to university teaching and the GSI experience in 80 minutes. The purpose of the series is to offer GSIs, and other graduate students interested in teaching, opportunities for hands-on learning and practical discussion about pedagogy.

Notes and handouts from selected workshops are available online.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 

As a national leader in preparing graduate students for teaching, UC Berkeley is one of the few universities in the country that have a comprehensive policy on GSI mentoring. The development activities that Berkeley GSIs undertake to fulfill the requirements of this policy—the Teaching Conference, the Online Ethics Course, and the 300-level pedagogy course in their disciplines—support GSIs in their teaching at UC Berkeley, but they also help form the foundation of their teaching and leadership skills in future academic and non-academic careers. The UC Berkeley Certificate Program in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education adds to these three basic requirements participation in workshops on teaching, teaching observation, creation of a teaching portfolio, and several other development activities.

For details, please see the Certificate Program Requirements.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Award-Winning GSI Teaching Ideas 

Over 200 essays written by recipients of the Teaching Effectiveness Award (TEA), a very competitive award given each year by the Graduate Council’s Faculty Advisory Committee for GSI Affairs. Each essay identifies a problem the GSI encountered in teaching, explains the GSI’s strategy and rationale in devising a solution, and assesses the effectiveness of the solution.

Visit the Teaching Effectiveness Award section of the GSI Center website.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Professionalism

Humanists@Work 

Humanists@Work is a UC-wide initiative geared towards UC Humanities and humanistic Social Science MAs and PhDs interested in careers outside/alongside the academy.

Humanists@Work is a targeted continuation of the Mellon-funded Humanities and Changing Conceptions of Work. This initiative, which sought to examine the changing conceptions and experiences of work in the face of major economic, technological and social developments, supported multi-campus research projects, individual scholars, and a daylong workshop geared to humanities graduate students. It was out of this workshop that Humanists@Work was born.

In partnership with the Modern Language Association’s “Connected Academics: Preparing Doctoral Students of Language and Literature for a Variety of Careers” project, UCHRI’s Humanists@Work project will conduct six workshops over the next three years and work closely with language and literature departments across the University of California system to ensure that their graduate students will attend and benefit from the training and engagement and that departments will take the lead in tracking the career prospects and job placements of their respective graduates. In addition to the statewide workshops, UCHRI will create a graduate student advisory committee to assist in planning the workshops and creating content for the website.


MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


CHEM295: Special Topics in Career Development 

A pilot course offered in the College of Chemistry open to all graduate students.

 

This course navigates all aspects of the path to career from the beginning stages of the Individual Development Plan (IDP) in grad school to negotiating your starting salary.


Ph.D. Career Counseling 

The Career Center offers the opportunity to meet with a Ph.D. counselor to discuss the academic job search and the widening range of career options for Ph.D.s. If you have any questions about the academic job search process or are unsure about what other possibilities you’d like to explore, feel free to make an appointment with one of the Career Center’s Ph.D. counselors:

Andrew Green (Ph.D., Political Science, UC Berkeley ’93) taught for six years at Connecticut College before joining the staff of the Career Center on April Fool’s Day, 1997.

Debra Behrens (Ph.D., Education, UC Santa Barbara) taught at California State University before joining the Career Center.

Provided by: Career Center  

Job Search Services 

The Career Center offers a variety of job search services, including CareerMail, a letter of recommendation compiling service, a database of job listings and on-campus recruiting events, and a resume book.

If you want to receive timely updates and information about opportunities and events designed specifically for graduate students and Ph.D.s, sign up for CareerMail. To do so, register or login to Callisto and on your profile select one of the two Ph.D. specific options (Ph.D.s in the Sciences/Eng or Ph.D.s in Hum/Soc Sci). You may also sign up for one or more of the industry-oriented lists (e.g., business, Environmental, or Sciences Biological & Physical).

Letter Service compiles and sends out letters of recommendation files.

Callisto provides online listings of part-time, full-time and temporary jobs exclusively for Cal undergraduate and graduate students. Upon graduation, Ph.D.s can maintain access by purchasing an Alumni Advantage membership. Over 500 employers annually conduct 15,000 interviews on-campus for full-time and summer positions through this web-based recruiting system. Graduate students and Ph.D. Alumni members are eligible and there is no longer a recruiting fee for this service.

Resume books are a job search tool that enables you to circulate your resume to potential employers. By including your resume in one or more of 14 books, you are allowing interested employers to view your resume and contact you directly about job openings and their recruitment activities.

Provided by: Career Center  

Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty 

Offered jointly by the Graduate Writing Center (formerly Academic Services) and the GSI Teaching & Resource Center, the aim of the Summer Institute for Preparing Future Faculty is to enable graduate students to excel in all aspects of academic life as they pursue an advanced degree at Berkeley and transition from graduate school to future academic careers. The Institute takes place at the end of the Spring semester. Graduate students who are nearing completion of their graduate programs and beginning to prepare for the academic job market are encouraged to apply. For more information or if you have questions about the Summer Institute, please see the Graduate Division’s GSI Teaching and Resource Center website, email gsi@berkeley.edu, or call (510) 642-4456.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center   Graduate Writing Center  

Individual Development Plan (IDP) 

At UC Berkeley the Individual Development Plan (IDP) is defined as a private, dynamic, annual self-evaluation and career exploration tool for graduate students and postdocs. It is a written list of goals mapped to a timeline and includes goal setting for research projects, skills development, and career planning.

The IDP is to be written and developed by the trainee, and can serve as a framework for discussion between faculty mentor and trainee. The IDP is most meaningful if trainees (with support from their mentors) make full use of the IDP’s potential as a research agenda and career development tool, and update it annually to reflect accomplishments and changes in career and research objectives.

Learn more about Individual Development Planning.

Provided by: Visiting Scholar and Postdoc Affairs (VSPA) Program   Career Center  

Leadership

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) 

Getting into Grad School (GiGS) is a collaborative partnership between the Office of Graduate Diversity and the Graduate Assembly (GA). Its goal is to prepare undergraduate UC Berkeley students to select, apply to, and enroll in graduate school. By working with key staff and graduate student mentors, motivated undergraduates are inspired to pursue academic careers as they acquire a better understanding of how to succeed in the graduate school application process.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly   Office for Graduate Diversity  

MCB295: Careers for Life Science PhDs 

MCB295 is a career and professional development seminar series for life science PhDs organized by students in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Each weekly session features a panel of speakers from a variety of careers who share their post-PhD paths. In addition, they host workshops on topics in career development, including networking, resume building, interview techniques, and negotiation skills.

To receive weekly updates about their events, sign up for their email list at the bottom of the page.

They meet every Monday evening in the spring semester from 6pm-8pm in Barker 101 on the UC Berkeley campus. Their full schedule can be found here.

Course Organizers: Spring 2016

Michelle Bloom is a 5th year graduate student in the Koshland lab. Throughout her graduate career she has been involved in many aspects of the Berkeley scientific community outside of lab by organizing Koshland Seminars, participating in planning the Expanding Your Horizons conference, and volunteering at the Lawrence Hall of Science. When she needs to get away from science, she finds comfort in her ongoing project to learn to play guitar, doing puzzles of all sorts, and baking. She is looking forward to exploring potential careers and networking with people who can help her get her ideal career through MCB 295.

Cindy Wang is a 5th-year MCB and Chemical Biology PhD student studying RNA structure to engineer RNA-based biosensors. Outside of science, she is an active classical musician and graphic designer, and her ideal career would merge all of these interests, but unfortunately no one has yet commissioned her to design an experimental modern opera about nucleic acid interactions. In the meantime, she continues to explore her options, and is looking forward to learning more through MCB295.


Graduate Assembly Delegates and Projects 

At UC Berkeley, every student has the power to actively engage with and change the world around them. Don’t just passively experience change in our world – help make change!

Become a Delegate and join students from across campus once a month to discuss campus and graduate student matters, direct your student leadership to action, and vote on important campus issues. Delegates represent their department or graduate student groups as voting member of the Graduate Assembly governing body and sit on influential campus-wide committees. If you are interested in joining the Delegate Assembly, contact the Internal Vice President at internal@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Delegates page.

The GA’s nine sponsored Projects are responsible for creating graduate-centered programming for a wide variety of campus communities. GA Project Directors and their volunteers host conferences, social and networking events, roundtables, and other events by and for graduate students. To get involved with a Project, email the Campus Affairs Vice President at cavp@ga.berkeley.edu or visit the GA Projects page.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) 

Student Mentoring and Research Teams (SMART) is a program offered by the GSI Teaching & Resource Center and the Graduate Writing Center that enables doctoral students to create mentored research opportunities for undergraduate students at UC Berkeley. The program provides summer funding for both graduate and undergraduate participants and opportunities to share research results on campus and at national conferences.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center   GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

The Berkeley Graduate 

The Berkeley Graduate, the Graduate Assembly-sponsored publication, is always looking for guest columnists. They welcome columns from Berkeley graduate and professional students on a wide variety of topics related to student life, research, and involvement in the wider community. Columns may range from how to survive and thrive as a graduate or professional student to the latest research in your department. They especially encourage topics that document or facilitate interaction and understanding across departments.

The goal of The Berkeley Graduate is to inform and inspire graduate students by connecting them to a campus-wide community online. By tapping into the collective knowledge of this body of students, they hope students learn from each other how to make the most of their time as Berkeley students; to highlight exciting, interdisciplinary, or collaborative research at Berkeley; and to encourage participation in the broader community through outreach and volunteer work.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Berkeley Connect 

Undergraduates at Berkeley increasingly wish for a more intimate and supportive academic experience, one in which they can be part of an intellectual community comprising faculty, graduate students, their fellow undergraduates, and alumni/ae. Berkeley Connect provides just such an experience by placing participants in small discussion groups assigned to a graduate mentor, who is responsible for group meetings and one-on-one advising. In addition, the program includes informal lectures by professors, visits to Berkeley resources, panel discussions of career opportunities and graduate school, and social events in which professors, graduate students, and undergraduates can talk informally about intellectual issues.

Provided by: Berkeley Connect  

Advanced Knowledge

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

BIDS Video Archive 

The Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS) provides a collection of recorded lectures that cover a wide range of topics, tools, programming languages, and methods of analysis of interest to budding graduate student data scientists.

Provided by: Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS)  

Empirical Research Methods Workshops 

In 2007 the Center for the Study of Law and Society (CSLS) launched the CSLS Empirical Research Methods Workshop series. The series introduces Berkeley Law faculty, CSLS affiliated faculty & visiting scholars, and graduate students interested in conducting empirical research on law to a wide range of empirical methods, both quantitative and qualitative. Workshops are led by leading experts on particular methodologies. All workshops are recorded and posted on the CSLS website, along with any necessary workshop materials.

Past topics include:

  • Criminal Justice Data Analysis
  • Using Video Records to Analyze Interactions
  • Ethnography of the Global
  • Survey Research in an Era of Diversity, Polarization, and Technological Change
  • Connecting Qualitative and Quantitative Methods
  • Social Network Analysis in Sociolegal Research
Provided by: Center for the Study of Law and Society  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Communication

Conference Travel Grants 

Academic master’s and all doctoral students may apply for Conference Travel Grant funding to attend professional conferences or to participate in professional development activities; however, students in professional degrees and self-sustaining programs are not eligible. For professional conferences, grant amounts will depend on the location of the conference (up to $600 within California, $900 elsewhere in North America, including Canada and Mexico, and $1,500 outside of North America). The amounts provided for professional development support will vary depending on the actual costs, but in no case will a grant exceed $1,500. Master’s students are eligible for only one travel grant per academic career. Doctoral students are eligible for two grants per academic career, regardless of how many degrees they earn. To be eligible to apply, applicants must:

  1. Be registered for the term in which they are planning to attend the conference, which also includes payment of fees/tuitions. Note: students on filing fee are not eligible.
  2. Be in good academic standing.
  3. Be presenting a paper or poster at the conference.

Please note that grant requests to support travel to professional conferences must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor; grant requests to support professional development activities may be approved by the student’s faculty advisor or the Associate Dean for the Graduate Division. Approvals are obtained through the Slate application portal.

Provided by: Graduate Fellowships Office  

Graduate Services in Doe Library 

Graduate Services in Doe Library offers a core non-circulating research collection that supports:

  • A quiet and congenial study space for graduate students and faculty
  • UC Berkeley’s graduate programs in the humanities and history
  • Course reserves for graduate humanities and social sciences courses

Graduate Services also houses the Dissertation Writer’s Room, which is a space dedicated to doctoral students advanced to candidacy.

Provided by: UC Berkeley Libraries  

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

GSPDP 320: Academic Writing for Graduate Students 

This course provides graduate students with formal instruction in the genres and mechanics of academic writing at the graduate and professorial level. Through presentations, readings, discussion, and weekly peer editing, graduate students will develop writing and editing skills necessary for their success as graduate students and future faculty.

Course Goals

  • to familiarize graduate students with the different genres of academic writing (e.g., seminar papers, journal articles, books, grant proposals, dissertation prospecti, etc.) and how these genres vary from discipline to discipline;
  • to help graduate students become better writers by analyzing writing on both the micro (sentence) and macro (organizational) levels;
  • to teach graduate students basic skills of professional editing so that they can become better editors of their own work and that of peers;
  • to enable graduate students to apply these skills to a piece of their own writing and to the writing of peers.
Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Graduate Assembly Travel Award 

The Graduate Assembly recognizes that a graduate student’s education requires presenting at conferences and/or seminars, some of which take place in locations outside the Bay Area. Since these conference locations are out of the area, some departments may not provide full financial assistance. As a result, the GA implemented the Travel Award to assist with travel expenses associated with presenting at conferences.

The Travel Award provides funding to graduate students presenting at conferences taking place outside of the San Francisco Bay Area. These conferences must benefit the student’s educational or research endeavors. To be eligible for the Travel Award, the student must be presenting at the conference. The application includes a section to be completed by the student’s Academic Advisor or program advisor, stating their support of the applicant’s attendance at the conference.

Read about the travel award.

Funding support for GA Travel Awards is provided as part of the Peet’s Coffee for a Cause Program. A portion of every Peet’s Coffee purchase made at Cal Dining Peet’s locations helps support student programs and initiatives including graduate travel grants, student scholarships, campus sustainability programs, a basic needs skills course, and an on-campus farm and gardening program. Visit the Peet’s partner page to learn more.

Provided by: Graduate Assembly  

Research

Consultations on Academic Writing 

The Graduate Writing Center offers individual consultations on topics such as academic writing, grant writing, dissertation writing, editing, and preparing articles for publication.

To learn more, contact Sabrina Soracco, Director of Graduate Writing Center, at (510) 643-9392 or via email. Also, visit the Graduate Writing Center online.

Provided by: Graduate Writing Center  

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods Training at D-Lab 

D-Lab’s workshops and other training offerings focus on students’ individual needs. They aim to help users needing short training around research software, tools, and techniques. They also address career planning, grant writing, and networking for graduate students. The trainings are designed for a wide range of skill levels and backgrounds to address a diverse user-base and promote a variety of methodologies, toolkits, and resources. Find out what trainings are coming up by visiting D-Lab’s website or subscribing to their weekly newsletter.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Working Groups at D-Lab 

D-Lab Working Groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Provided by: D-Lab  

D-Lab Newsletter 

A weekly newsletter full of information about the qualitative and quantitative methods trainings hosted by D-Lab, their interdisciplinary workgroups, and data science in the news. Sign up at the D-Lab website.

Provided by: D-Lab  

Protection of Human Subjects Student Investigators Guide 

The Committee for Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) has put together a guide to introduce students to the process of submitting an application to CPHS, UC Berkeley’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), including key information and associated content links to other areas of the CPHS website. The Office for Protection of Human Subjects (OPHS) is the administrative office that supports the CPHS. The OPHS staff team consists of friendly, knowledgeable professionals who are ready to assist you with human subjects research-related questions and concerns.

Provided by: Office for the Protection of Human Subjects  


Teaching

GSI Teaching Gallery 

This video series showcases examples of several common GSI activities. Some frequent kinds of classroom interactions can be difficult to visualize for instructors unfamiliar with running a section or lab but these four highly effective Berkeley GSIs generously allowed us to record a class period. Most of the videos are from one to three minutes long.

Visit the GSI Teaching Gallery.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Teaching Guide for GSIs 

The Teaching Guide is meant to give UC Berkeley GSIs well informed guidance as they begin teaching and throughout their GSI appointments as they continue to hone their skills. Most of the material was researched and developed by current and former GSIs at Berkeley, so it’s contextualized to our teaching situations, our students, and the resources the campus makes available to us.

Visit the Teaching Guide for GSIs.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

How Students Learn: Talks by UC Berkeley Faculty Researchers 

Structuring class activities and assignments that best help students learn is a difficult art to master, so GSIs do well to become informed about the practices that are most effective for student learning and what makes them effective.

On the GSI Center website, you will find links to a variety of resources that explain research on learning, which GSIs can reflect on and apply to their teaching.

Visit the How Students Learn section of the GSI Center website for more information.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

GSI Professional Standards and Ethics Online Course 

Through this course GSIs learn about policies, practices, and standards that all instructors need to know in order to perform their responsibilities professionally and ethically. The course is structured in five modules:

  • Promoting Learning through Diversity: The Inclusive Classroom
  • Teaching Students with Disabilities
  • Creating an Educational Environment Free of Sexual Harassment
  • Fostering Academic Integrity
  • GSI Responsibilities and Ethics

The goal of this online course is to enable GSIs to carry out their responsibilities in a manner that promotes student learning and their own growth as instructors while upholding the professional standards and expectations of the University. Along with the seminar on teaching and learning in higher education that GSIs take in their departments, the Teaching Conference, and the mentoring GSIs receive from the faculty member whom they teach with, this online course  provides GSIs with an excellent foundation as they begin to teach at Berkeley.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Workshops on Teaching for GSIs 

Offered each semester, the GSI Center’s Workshops on Teaching for GSIs cover a wide variety of topics related to university teaching and the GSI experience in 80 minutes. The purpose of the series is to offer GSIs, and other graduate students interested in teaching, opportunities for hands-on learning and practical discussion about pedagogy.

Notes and handouts from selected workshops are available online.

Provided by: GSI Teaching & Resource Center  

Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 

As a national leader in preparing graduate students for teaching, UC Berkeley is one of the few universities in the country that have a comprehensive policy on GSI mentoring. The development activities that Berkeley GSIs undertake to fulfill the requirements of this policy—the Teaching Conference, the Online Ethics Cour