Kelly Clancy

Berkeley Grad Wins Regeneron Prize for Creative Innovation

Kelly Clancy, a graduate student in Biophysics, has won the Regeneron Prize for Creative Innovation, a newly established award with only two winners each year. As the reward, Clancy took home a trophy and a $50,000 cash prize. UC Berkeley will also receive an award to support a seminar series.

Summer School of Molecular Medicine at Jena — 5/25/2014

The Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research of the University Hospital of Jena, Germany, invites young scientists to participate in the Summer School of Molecular Medicine. Held from August 18 to September 18 in Jena, this program will provide an excellent opportunity … Continued

Above the Napa Valley: George Rubissow Pairs Science with Wine

While the spanakopita rests on the counter to cool, George Rubissow suggests a walk through the vineyards. He leads us to the picturesque front porch of his yellow farmhouse, its blue chairs surrounded by spring flowers that tumble downhill toward a breathtaking view of the Napa Valley. We follow him uphill past a small redwood grove to the sustainable vineyards, environmentally-friendly and planted to follow the contours of the property. This is Mount Veeder, an appellation famous for Cabernet Sauvignon, where for nearly a quarter of a century Rubissow and his partner-in-wine Tony Sargent have produced award-winning wines.

Out of the lab to the top of the world; Berkeley biophysicist relishes first ascents

One September evening in 1970, working alone in my chemistry lab in Latimer Hall, I was preparing nucleic acid for my final experiments for my Ph.D. in biophysical chemistry. The lab was quiet except for the repetitive tick of the spinning centrifuge. After finishing the purification, to my horror, I knocked the vial onto the floor, where it shattered, the precious liquid lost.

Investing in Science Futures: the ARCS Foundation

When the Russians sent Sputnik I, the world’s first artificial satellite, into space on October 4, 1957, they unknowingly launched a women’s movement in America which would bring good fortune to higher education — Berkeley in particular — for years to come.